Increase Your Bone Density With These Supplements

Steve just uploaded his latest podcast on how to build strong healthy bones for a lifetime. Thanks Steve.

“My wife increased her bone density by 7 % in 7 years.”

Steve LankfordI have worked with a lot of women regarding their bone health. It is one of the major concerns for women as they age. I know from personal experience as my wife went from osteopenia to osteoporosis by her mid 50s. This occurred even though she was on a quality bone support formula. She had the same result as thousands of other women who we desperate to stop the bone loss. Something was wrong.

The nutrients were all the reported required nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, vitamins D, B6 etc. These were the better of the formulas available in the early 2000s. My wife was looking for a solution that did not involve the drugs.

It was at this time that we learned something new about osteoporosis. We learned that strontium is used as a treatment for osteoporosis in some parts of the world. We learned of another nutrient called ipriflavone which has a similar benefit, and we were all learning about the importance of higher dose vitamin D3. So these were added to her supplement program. Her doctor was skeptical and wanted her to take a bisphosphonate bone building drug. No, thank you. As a result, her bone density was increased by nearly 4 percent in 4 years. Wow. She was then 60 years old and building bone.

Around 2010 we began to learn more about bone support nutrients.We discovered BioSil (orthosilisic acid) a specific Building Healthy Bones for Lifeform of collagen building silica. And we learned about vitamin K2. And so these were added to her program. The result after 2 more years was another 3 percent improvement in bone density. She is up 7 % in 7 years. She is soon due for her next bone density scan. Will this trend continue? It’s been an exciting result so far, and we anticipate continued benefit.

This is an expensive program to follow if you take everything my wife takes. So here is my list in declining order of importance. I have no basis for this other than personal experience of my wife and other women I have advised. You need to determine the program that you are comfortable with and can afford.

  • A high quality natural bone support formula – if you aren’t sure visit a knowledgeable health food store. Print Bone Health Article PDFThere are now bone building formulas that include higher amounts of vitamin D3 and added K2. Some even include strontium as a separate formula. These may be the more cost effective but somewhat limited way to go. Look for quality brands and then compare formulas and price.
  • Vitamin D3 – Get tested and the adjust to the optimum dose for you.
  • Vitamin K2 – 80 to 100 mcg. per day.
  • BioSil – follow label directions.
  • Strontium – 680 mg. per day, taken apart from calcium.
  • ipriflavone – follow label directions.

In this podcast, I will give you my best advice for women who are concerned about osteoporosis. You can also print out a copy of my paper entitled “A Natural Approach to Bone Health”. You will find in depth interview on vitamin D3, K2 and BioSil at HealthQuestPodcast.com. Search the TAG INDEX to easily find all related content.

From: steve@healthquestpodcast.com

PO Box 372
Suamico, WI 54173

Reality Of Heavy Metals In Food

Metals Naturally Occur in Healthy Soil, What is Considered Toxic?

(February 6, 2014, Los Angeles, CA) – Axiom Foods, whose Oryzatein® enzyme-extracted, whole grain sprouted brown rice protein is supplied to food manufacturers throughout the U.S., Europe and other countries, is embarking on a campaign to educate consumers about the reality of heavy metals in plant foods

Since the sharp rise of vegetarianism and veganism in the U.S. (Google Trends reported a doubling of veganism since 2010), those whose diets consist mostly of vegetables have a naturally higher heavy metal contribution to their bodies* than those who ingest an animal-based diet.

lipstick tubesAn ethically-based food ingredient provider, Axiom is on a mission to make consumers aware of all the aspects of how and why metals naturally occur in vegetables that grow in healthy soil, so they can make informed decisions about their intake and understand if and when those levels are toxic to the body.

The problem with any metals, beneficial or not, is when the substance reaches toxic levels in the body.  The question is: what is considered to be toxic and what testing methods are certified to determine toxicity? What happens when test results are reported as parts per million vs parts per billion?

Here is a list of facts:

  • Heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium and lead are found in all plants that grow in healthy soil because they are natural constituents of the Earth’s crust and have existed on earth since its formation (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 2011)
  • Some metals, such as iron, copper, chromium, cobalt, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and zinc are required by the human body in trace amounts as essential nutrients. Naturally, any metal in the soil or surrounding bodies of water will leech into any plants we consume.   This environmental exposure impacts both organic and conventionally grown crops (European Food Safety Authority, 2012, “Metals as Contaminants in Food.
  •   We consume metals in common plant foods daily, from spinach to spices. Any metal, including those that are essential to the body to function can cause toxicity if introduced at high levels (Total Diet Study Statistics on Element Results, 2007, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration).
  • Some plants that grow in water, such as rice, spinach and asparagus, are often targeted as contaminated by heavy metals because some crops have been found to be in polluted areas of the world.  This is well known by efficacious growers and manufacturers and as such they consciously choose pristine fields and regularly test in specifically certified laboratories to ensure levels are below what is considered to be toxic. In China, for example, one polluted field cited in the news recently was 3000 miles away from where Axiom has sourced rice on the Himalayan border of Tibet.
  • Testing for contamination in food products needs to be done in accredited laboratories in the United States, where standards for calibration exist and highly-educated practitioners test with accepted scientific methodologies.  Test results can vary vastly based on seemingly insignificant factors. In April, 2013, Dr. Tongesayi of Monmouth University, released a study showing he’d found levels of metal that exceeded FDA safety limits. It turned out he recalled his tests because his instruments were not calibrated.
  • The benefits for plant-based protein outweigh the negatives. Approximately 50 million people in the US are allergic to or intolerant to dairy and 1 in 133 Americans suffer from allergies to wheat gluten, according to the National Foundation of Celiac Awareness; many plant-based proteins are allergen-friendly, aside from soy protein..
  • Standards for levels of metals are set by World Health Organization (W.H.O.), The European Union, The Canadian Natural Health Products Directorate, the U.S. FDA (tolerable daily intake), US Pharmacopeia, U.S. EPA (drinking water) and California’s Proposition 65. All companies that sell products with any levels of metals must be tested by  accredited laboratories. These tests are measured in “parts per million” (ppm); when numbers are reported as “parts per billion” (ppb) they appear exaggeratedly large and raise unnecessary alarm to the consumer.
  • The FDA has yet to set levels for heavy metals in rice, but has used Axiom Food’s technology as the standard for responsible sourcing, fractioning and manufacturing of rice protein. Axiom’s Oryzatein® is in the process of becoming the first GRAS certified rice protein, which will lead toward it becoming the world’s first FDA monographed standard for the entire industry. Oryzatein® was also used in the first double blind clinical trial that showed it equals animal-based whey in building and repairing muscle.
  • Errors can occur in testing and managing levels because natural conditions can change plus accredited labs report that levels can vary by 50% when the amounts of heavy metals that are being found and tested are so small.  The amounts are similar to taking a cube of sugar, chopping it into 1,000 pieces, taking one of those pieces and then chopping it into 1,000 more pieces, and then testing that final piece.
  • How much one ingests is not indicative of how much is retained as the body is a natural filter, dependent upon health factors and level of nutrition, as many foods act as natural antioxidants, helping further filter heavy metals.
“Because we provide whole grain sprouted brown rice protein to food manufacturers worldwide,” said Axiom CEO, David Janow, “certifying bodies such as the FDA and USDA watch what we do very closely and come to us for intelligence on setting standards.  Testing our products in the most well-respected and, most importantly, certified laboratories, is a continuous part of our daily process.  Proper testing will make the difference between something that appears to be safe or toxic. We provide our test results to our customers. We source from the most pristine fields in the world and avoid polluted areas.  As makers of human food, we are in a highly responsible position and work as closely with Mother Nature as she will allow.  At this time in history, avoiding pollution of any kind is no easy task, but it’s something we pursue diligently as part of our standards and practices.”


Here is a table that shows metals found in common foods:

Max. Amounts of Lead, Arsenic, Cadmium found in commonly consumed Foods**
  Lead Arsenic Cadmium
Spinach, fresh, boiled (180g)1 cup 11.5 mcg 7.7 mcg 94.3 mcg
Cucumber, raw (52g) ½ cup 1.6 mcg 1.3 mcg 0.4 mcg
Strawberries, raw (72g) ½ cup 1.2 mcg 0.8 mcg 4.7 mcg
Avocado, raw (75g) ½ cup 3.0 mcg 2.8 mcg 8.0 mcg
Collards, fresh, boiled (190g) 1 cup 25.8 mcg 2.7 mcg 23.2 mcg
Asparagus, fresh, boiled (180g) 1 cup 2.5 mcg 25.0 mcg
Iceberg lettuce, raw (72g) 1 cup 0.4 mcg 1.0 mcg 23.3 mcg
White potato baked w/ skin (138g) 1 cup 2.8 mcg 5.8 mcg 15.5 mcg
Broccoli, fresh, boiled (156g) 1 cup 2.2 mcg 4.7 mcg


**Based on Total Diet Study Statistics on Element Results. 2007, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, US Food and Drug Administration

Axiom Foods is the most innovative source for allergen-friendly, whole grain brown rice ingredients and known for their natural and proprietary methodologies for extracting fractions of other plant proteins such as pea, sacha inchi and others. Since 2005, the California-based company has maximized the potential of whole grain brown rice in all its forms. Their signature Oryzatein® is the only sprouted brown rice protein of its kind. Axiom continues to widen the possibilities of the world’s third largest plant crop into healthful products on which humans thrive.

 

Foods On The Fertility Buffet

roasted red pepperRoasted red peppers, mini crab cakes and Brazil nuts can all help to increase fertility. They will all feature in a special Fertility Buffet, laid on by Dr Margaret Rayman, Director of the MSc Course in Nutritional Medicine at the University of Surrey, on 3 July 2003.

A good, balanced diet rich in fruit and vegetables (at least five portions a day) and protein sources such as meat, poultry and fish, is necessary to optimise fertility.

Meat is a good source of animal protein and important minerals such as iron and zinc, the latter being especially important for fertility. “Oysters are by far the best source of zinc, but they are not included in this meal, as they are crab cakesout of season,” Dr Rayman explained. “Fatty fish is a very good source of n-3 fatty acids, which are important in the development of the fetus’ brain and vision.”

To give yourself the best chance of conceiving, alcohol and smoking should be avoided. This applies to both men and women, as there is evidence that sperm damage through smoking can predispose to cancer in the offspring.

All the dishes on the buffet were carefully selected by Vicky Chudleigh, State Registered Dietician from Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge.

“The sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seed bread contains vitamin E, which is claimed to be an pumpkin sessame seed breadaphrodisiac because of its effects on boosting circulation. It is also an antioxidant and needed for fertility,” Vicky explained.

“Brazil nuts and mini crab cakes are both excellent sources of selenium and required for sperm motility. Without adequate selenium, sperm tails kink and break off. Selenium also minimises the risk of miscarriages.”

chocolate mousseRoasted red peppers, tomatoes, pesto (containing basil) and of course, chocolate mousse, were all selected for their reputed aphrodisiac qualities.

Spinach, together with other dark green leafy vegetables, provide the folate required to reduce the risk of neural tube defect in the developing baby. The cheese platter not only contains calcium and zinc, but also vitamin A, which aids the production of sex hormones. They are all needed for healthy reproduction and libido.

The fertility buffet will not only be a gastronomic experience, but also forms part of the module, Pregnancy, Infancy & Childbirth in the Nutritional Medicine course, aimed at doctors. But there will be no retiring to the drawing room after dinner, as the doctors on the course will need to complete an assignment on dietary advice to give to their patients.

http://www.surrey.ac.uk

Nutrition Improves Schoolchildren’s Learning and Memory

In a 12 month study of 780 children in Australia and Indonesia, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers assessed the effects of adding a specific vitamin and mineral mix to a daily drink.
In Australia, children that received the daily drink with the added vitamin and mineral mix performed significantly better on mental performance tests than children in a control group that received the drink without added nutrients. In Indonesia a similar trend was observed, but only in the girls.
This study confirms that nutrition can positively influence cognitive development in schoolchildren, even in western children who are well-fed.

The scientists studied 396 well-nourished children in Australia and 384 poorly nourished children in Indonesia. In each country, the children were randomly allocated to one of four groups, receiving a drink with either a mix of micronutrients (iron, zinc, folate and vitamins A, B-6, B-12 and C) or with fish-oil (DHA and EPA), or with both added, or with nothing added (placebo).

After twelve months, children in Australia who received the drink with the nutrient mix showed higher blood levels of these micronutrients, which means that their bodies were taking up the nutrients. In addition, they performed significantly better on tests measuring their learning and memory capabilities compared to children in the other groups. A similar trend was observed in Indonesia, but only in the girls. The addition of fish oil to the fortified drink did not conclusively show any additional effects on cognition.

This study adds to the mounting evidence that nutrition plays an important role in mental development in children. Previously, deficiencies in iron and iodine have been linked to impaired cognitive development in young children; there is also emerging evidence that deficiencies in zinc, folate and vitamin B12 compromise mental development in children. More recently, fish oils (EPA, DHA) have also been linked to child cognitive development.

Most studies to date have focused on deficiencies in single nutrients in young age groups. Yet the brain continues to grow and develop during childhood and adolescence. Little is known about the role of nutrition for mental development after the age of 2, nor have many studies looked at the effect of offering a mix of nutrients. Until this study, there were very few randomized controlled intervention studies assessing the impact of a multiple-micronutrient intervention on cognitive function in schoolchildren.

This study confirms that nutrition can positively influence cognitive development in schoolchildren, even in children who are well-fed. The researchers suggest that this finding could be relevant across the western world.
The investigators recommend further research to investigate the exact role of DHA and EPA in healthy school-aged children. Another research focus is the further optimization of cognitive development tests with respect to their validity and sensitivity across cultures. The scientists suggest that the smaller effects of the vitamins and minerals in Indonesia could be a result of a lower sensitivity of the cognitive tests in that country.

This study was performed by the NEMO study group (Nutrition Enhancement for Mental Optimization), which consists of the Unilever Food and Health Research Institute (Vlaardingen, The Netherlands); CSIRO, Human Nutrition (Adelaide, Australia) and the SEAMEO-TROPMED Regional Center for Community Nutrition, University of Indonesia (Jakarta Pusat, Indonesia).

http://www.unilever.com

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