Brain Training and Daily Intermitent Fasting Improves Cognition

OSSINING, N.Y., March 19, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Known for giving very sharp, lucid interviews, the late Walter Breuning at 114 was the oldest man in the world. He followed a Daily Intermittent Fasting plan, eating a large breakfast, smaller lunch and then fasting until the next morning. His eating plan resonates with Brain Booster members of LivingTheCRWay.com, who find that some time away from food improves brain function.

thumb_memory_preventing_loss_coverBrain Boosters focus on improving memory, processing speed, accuracy, and thought synchronization � while reducing risk of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases and dementia.

“When scientists or doctors make discoveries that can affect people’s lives positively, LivingTheCRWay invites them to host live teleconferences that are friendly conversations with the members. Participants have time to ask questions that matter to them,” says Paul McGlothin, President of LivingTheCRWay.com. He continues, “A short fast to improve brain health was inspired by the work of Dr. Mark Mattson, Chief Neurobiologist of the National Institute on Aging.”

Listen as Dr. Mattson discusses the research that helped LivingTheCRWay create its Brain Booster plan: Calorie Restriction for a Better Brain (http://rs1475.freeconferencecall.com/fcc/cgi-bin/play.mp3/4242038075-965256-17.mp3).

The Brain Booster program includes:

  • Healthful, delicious meals � food and recipe suggestions to improve brain function
  • Low Blood Glucose � glucose control plans to promote formation of new neurons while reducing risk of Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases
  • Daily Intermittent Fasting � safe ketone production, facilitating learning while protecting neurons from dangerous oxidative stress
  • Stress Reduction � decline in neuron-damaging stress while the cerebral cortex size increases and circulation improves
  • Circadian Optimization � Better concentration when needed, with easier bed-time relaxation and more restorative sleep
  • Improved neural synchrony � better coordination of thought processes

The LivingTheCRWay Brain Booster teleconference on April 3, features Dr. Emily Rogalski, PhD, of Northwestern University, who recently identified a select group of “SuperAgers” in their 80s who perform better on tested cognitive functions than people 30 years younger. People of all ages who want to boost their brain power can find out more by calling 877-841-4841 or emailing Info@LivingTheCRWay.com

LivingTheCRWay memberships (http://store.livingthecrway.com/calorie-restriction-cr-way-memberships-plans-to-achieve-your-goals/) support DNA HACR

(http://store.livingthecrway.com/how-fast-are-you-aging-and-what-you-can-do-about-it/) a citizen science study, launched in partnership with the CR Society International. Additional LivingTheCRWay memberships include Healthful Weight Loss, Optimal Health, Longevity Level, and Diabetes Intervention.

LivingTheCRWay

LivingTheCRWay.com (http://www.livingthecrway.com/landing.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fhome.aspx) makes it easy to put science into practice for more years of great health. Departing from dehumanized electronic communications � LivingTheCRWay is a friendly, holistic online community. Members enjoy delicious, healthful lifestyles that include live, supportive teleconferences � often with a leader in the world of science and health

(http://calorierestrictiondietplan.com/science-and-health-news-views/livingthecrway-com-presents-experts-in-health-and-longevity/)

Dopamine Regulates The Motivation To Act

The widespread belief that dopamine regulates pleasure could go down in history with the latest research results on the role of this neurotransmitter. Researchers have proved that it regulates motivation, causing individuals to initiate and persevere to obtain something either positive or negative.

The neuroscience journal Neuron publishes an article by researchers at the Universitat Jaume I of Castellón that reviews the prevailing theory on dopamine and poses a major paradigm shift with applications in diseases related to lack of motivation and mental fatigue and depression, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, etc. and diseases where there is excessive motivation and persistence as in the case of addictions.

“It was believed that dopamine regulated pleasure and reward and that we release it when we obtain something that satisfies us, but in fact the latest scientific evidence shows that this neurotransmitter acts before that, it actually encourages us to act. In other words, dopamine is released in order to achieve something good or to avoid something evil”, explains Mercè Correa.

Studies had shown that dopamine is released by pleasurable sensations but also by stress, pain or loss. These research results however had been skewed to only highlight the positive influence, according to Correa. The new article is a review of the paradigm based on the data from several investigations, including those conducted over the past two decades by the Castellón group in collaboration with the John Salamone of the University of Connecticut (USA), on the role of dopamine in the motivated behaviour in animals.

The level of dopamine depends on individuals, so some people are more persistent than others to achieve a goal. “Dopamine leads to maintain the level of activity to achieve what is intended. This in principle is positive, however, it will always depend on the stimuli that are sought: whether the goal is to be a good student or to abuse of drugs” says Correa. High levels of dopamine could also explain the behavior of the so-called sensation seekers as they are more motivated to act.

Application for depression and addiction

Dopamine

 

To know the neurobiological parameters that make people be motivated by something is important to many areas such as work, education or health. Dopamine is now seen as a core neurotransmitter to address symptoms such as the lack of energy that occurs in diseases such as depression. “Depressed people do not feel like doing anything and that’s because of low dopamine levels,” explains Correa. Lack of energy and motivation is also related to other syndromes with mental fatigue such as Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis or fibromyalgia, among others.

In the opposite case, dopamine may be involved in addictive behaviour problems, leading to an attitude of compulsive perseverance. In this sense, Correa indicates that dopamine antagonists which have been applied so far in addiction problems probably have not worked because of inadequate treatments based on a misunderstanding of the function of dopamine.

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