India’s First Curcumin Functional Ice Cream

Curcumin Ice Cream

India’s National Dairy Institute Combines Milk, Curcumin For A New Take On Ice Cream

Tumeric has long been a remedy and a food in Southeast Asia. It’s not surprising that we’d see the first functional ice cream as well. In a blend of food technology and traditional pharmacology, researches figured out how to encapsulate the curcumin with casein. Once that worked, the game was afoot. Can’t wait to see what else they come up with. How about it cheeseheads?
→  Read full article

Curcumin Black Pepper Combo Concerns

Curcumin Roots and Powder
Black Pepper Corns

In the quest to boost absorption of curcumin, some experiments have been done using a combination of curcumin and black pepper (piperine).

One of the challenges using this combo is that piperine is contraindicated with many prescription medications because it negatively alters drug metabolism.

With the majority of the U.S. population taking some prescription drug, casual experimentation can have unintended consequences. A new study has shown piperine actually reduces the health benefits of curcumin.

Researchers have found the addition of piperine negatively impacted curcumin’s blood sugar balancing and reduction of oxidative stress. It also caused abnormal elevations in liver enzymes .

Further Reading: Herb-Drug Interactions: A Literature Review

Like Curry? New Biological Role For Curcumin Identified

Oregon State University (OSU) scientists recently identified a new reason why some curry dishes, made with spices humans have used for thousands of years, might be good for you. New research has discovered that curcumin, a compound found in the cooking spice turmeric, can cause a modest but measurable increase in levels of a protein that’s known to be important in the “innate” immune system, helping to prevent infection in humans and other animals.

Tumeric Rood and Powder, Source of CurcuminThis cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) is part of what helps the immune system fight off various bacteria, viruses or fungi even though they hadn’t been encountered before. Prior to this, it was known that CAMP levels were increased by vitamin D. Discovery of an alternative mechanism to influence or raise CAMP levels is of scientific interest and could open new research avenues in nutrition and pharmacology, scientists said.

The newest findings were made by researchers in the Linus Pauling Institute at OSU and published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

“This research points to a new avenue for regulating CAMP gene expression,” said Adrian Gombart, associate professor of biochemistry and biophysics at the Linus Pauling Institute. “It’s interesting and somewhat surprising that curcumin can do that, and could provide another tool to develop medical therapies.”

The impact of curcumin in this role is not nearly as potent as that of vitamin D, Gombart said, but could nonetheless have physiologic value. Curcumin has also been studied for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

“Curcumin, as part of turmeric, is generally consumed in the diet at fairly low levels,” he said. “However, it’s possible that sustained consumption over time may be healthy and help protect against infection, especially in the stomach and intestinal tract.”

In the study, Chunxiao Guo, a graduate student, and Gombart looked at the potential of both curcumin and omega-3 fatty acids to increase expression of the CAMP gene. They found no particular value with the omega-3 fatty acids for this purpose, but curcumin did have a clear effect, causing CAMP levels to almost triple.

There has been intense scientific interest in the vitamin D receptor in recent years because of potential therapeutic benefits in treating infection, cancer, psoriasis and other diseases, the researchers noted in their report. An alternative way to elicit a related biological response could be significant and merits additional research, they said.

The CAMP peptide is the only known antimicrobial peptide of its type in humans, researchers said. It appears to have the ability to kill a broad range of bacteria, including those that cause tuberculosis and protect against the development of sepsis.

Related Resources

Tumeric Compound Has Neuroprotective Effects

Compound From Turmeric Has Neuroprotective Effects

Two new studies suggest that a compound derived from turmeric may have clinical promise for ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI), both of which currently lack good therapies.
A synthetic derivative of turmeric made by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies dramatically improved the behavioral and molecular deficits seen in animal models of these conditions.
In previous studies, David R. Schubert and Pamela Maher in the Salk Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory had developed a series of new compounds using a novel drug discovery paradigm that starts with natural products derived from plants; it then calls for selecting synthetic derivatives that show efficacy in multiple assays testing protection against various aspects of the nerve cell damage and death that occur in brain injuries and in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases.
One compound, called CNB-001, which was derived from curcumin, the active ingredient in the spice turmeric, proved highly neuroprotective in all of the assays; it also enhanced memory in normal animals.

Additional information from Science Daily and the Journal of Neurochemisty on curcumin studies.

 

Permalink: http://www.nutritionnews.com/health/tumeric-compou…ective-effects/ ‎Edit tumeric-compound-has-neuroprotective-effects

View the full article at Vitamin Retailer Magazine

Superfoods cover image

Play The Is It Healthy Game!

Read Nutrition News

JoinM o

Making Healthy Choices is Easier Than You Think

ur mai

You have Successfully Subscribed!