40% of Consumers More Likely to Shop with Retailers That Offer Green Packaging

Consumers Value Environmentally Friendly Supply Chain Practices

Earth Friendly Sustainable PackagingEnvironment-friendly packaging and green supply chain practices are important to most online shoppers, according to a new study from Dotcom Distribution, a provider of fulfillment and logistics services for both brands.

The study, which surveyed over 500 online shoppers about their packaging preferences, found that 57 percent of consumers say that green packaging is important to them—and 61 percent of consumers have considered green packaging when deciding where to shop.

“Today’s consumers are environmentally aware, and making changes to become more environmentally friendly is one of the best things you can do as a brand,” said Maria Haggerty, CEO of Dotcom Distribution, in a news release. “Brands that are not able to make sustainable changes themselves should look to third-party logistics providers that can help implement these changes in a cost-effective way.”

Survey respondents noted that they’re also concerned about individual retailers’ carbon footprints. The study found that 55 percent of shoppers have considered an online retailer’s overall carbon footprint when deciding where to shop, and 64 percent have considered supply chain practices, like low-impact shipping processes, when deciding between brands.

As major retailers like Apple begin to address these issues, it’s important that emerging brands also consider environmentally friendly practices to attract and retain loyal customers. While Apple recently bought 36,000 acres of forest to sustainably produce packaging, smaller brands can still make a difference by implementing changes that are less drastic. Haggerty argues that green packaging doesn’t always take the form of a plain brown box.

“Green packaging comes in many forms, and retailers can consider various different factors like inks, source materials and recyclability when deciding to make environmentally friendly changes,” said Haggerty. “For brands looking to reduce their carbon footprints but lack the resources to do so, implementing one or two small, cost-effective changes will still make a big difference.”

Source: PRWeb; edited by Richard Carufel

Wondering What Your Carbon Footprint Looks Like?

Your_Carbon_Footprint

EarthTalkTM
From the Editors of E/The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: How can I measure—and then improve—my overall “carbon footprint?” What are the major areas of one’s daily life that one measures? — Andy Fusco, Passaic, NJ

With global warming dominating so many headlines today, it’s no surprise that many of us are looking to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases our activities produce.

By assessing how much pollution each of your individual actions generates—be it setting your thermostat, shopping for groceries, commuting to work or flying somewhere for vacation—you can begin to see how changing a few habits here and there can significantly reduce your overall carbon footprint. Luckily for those of us who want to see how we measure up, there are a number of free online carbon footprint calculators to help figure out just where to start changing.

One of the best is the University of California at Berkeley’s Cool Climate Calculator. The free web-based tool takes into account daily driving mileage and grocery and electricity expenses, among other factors, to assign a carbon score, which users can compare to similar households across the 28 largest urban areas in the U.S. Some of the results are surprising. For example, residents of eco-aware San Francisco tend to have bigger carbon footprints than those in more conservative Tampa, Florida. The reason: San Francisco has a higher cost of living and colder, wetter winters (requiring more fossil-fuel derived heat). (more…)

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