Negative Emotions Impact A Woman’s Drinking During Pregnancy

Binge Drinking During Pregnancy Linked to Negative Emotions

Pregnant Woman With Wine Glass On StomachResearchers in Norway found that negative affectivity is linked to light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy. Results published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, show 16% of women had light alcohol use in the first trimester and 10% in the second trimester.

Binge drinking occurred in 12% of women during their first trimester and 0.5% in the second trimester.
Experts describe negative affectivity as the tendency to experience negative emotions such as anxiety and depression.

Individuals with negative affectivity tend to have an unfavorable view of themselves and the world in general. Previous studies have associated negative affectivity with greater vulnerability to stress, intense emotional reactions to daily life, and inclination to use intoxicants in response to stress.

Mothers who use alcohol while pregnant place their unborn child at risk for premature birth, low birth weight, fetal alcohol syndrome and even fetal death. These serious health risks have led health experts around the world to recommend that women abstain from alcohol while trying to conceive and during pregnancy.

Yet prior evidence indicates that 25% to 50% of women report drinking alcohol while pregnant, with low income level, partner’s drinking behavior, and mother’s pre-pregnancy alcohol use all contributing risk factors.

The present population-based study, led by Dr. Kim Stene-Larsen from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, Norway, used data from 66,111 pregnant women and their partners who were part of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Mothers filled out surveys related to alcohol use at 17 and 30 weeks of gestation.

The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) was used in the present study to measure

  • light alcohol use (0.5 to 2 units, 1-4 times per month) and
  • binge drinking (intake of 5 alcohol units or more in a single drinking episode).

In Norway one unit of alcohol is equivalent toAlcohol Beverage Glasses

  • one glass (1/3 liter or ≈11 oz) of beer,
  • one sherry glass of fortified wine, or
  • one snaps (shot) glass of spirit or liqueur.”

Negative affectivity was assessed in gestational weeks 17 and 30 using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist, which measures anxiety and depression. Medical evidence has established that measures of anxiety and depression symptoms are comparable to negative affectivity measures.

Findings indicate that with each unit increase in maternal negative affectivity, the odds for light alcohol increased in the first and second trimester, 27% and 28%, respectively.

The odds for binge drinking were much higher at 55% in the first trimester and 114% in the second trimester for each unit increase of negative affectivity in the mother.

“Our findings clearly show a link between a mother’s negative emotions, such as depression and anxiety, and light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy,” concludes Dr. Stene-Larsen. “Further study is needed to understand why women continue to drink alcohol while pregnant despite health warnings.”

“Our findings clearly show a link between a mother’s negative emotions,

such as depression and anxiety, and light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy”

References:

http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/PressRelease/pressReleaseId-109689.html?dmmsmid=79411&dmmspid=22624498&dmmsuid=2117073

 

How’s Your Mood? What’s Your Number?

One of the quickest ways to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of mental health is to take a screening test. Here’s a short survey that’s completely anonymous and may alert you to symptoms of Bi-Polar Disorder, Depression, Anxiety or PSTD.

Check it out at Mental Health America.

What's Your Number Free Mental Health Screening

Taking a screening test is one of the quickest and easiest ways to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition. The M3 screening test on this site is completely anonymous and confidential.

The 3 Minute Test tests for Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder and PTSD. These are serious conditions that affect, not only your quality of life, but your physical health.

Did you know that having a mood disorder may increase your heart attack risk and decrease your ability to recover from other illnesses like stroke, diabetes, multiple sclerosis and cancer?

Your M3 score is a number that will help you and your doctor understand if you have a treatable mood disorder, like depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, or post-traumatic stress disorder.

What’s my M3? Knowing can help you take control of your mental health, and you can discover yours in about three minutes with our free, confidential test.

– See more at: http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/llw/depression_screen.cfm#sthash.M9Kh99Jk.dpuf

Common Causes Of Memory Slips

BOSTON—Worried that you’re getting more forgetful lately? Chill out, because the stress can contribute to memory slips. In fact, stress is one of the four horsemen of forgetfulness in aging brains, along with anxiety, depression, and sleep deprivation, reports the February 2013 Harvard Men’s Health Watch.

When memory seems to slip, many older people wonder if they are sliding into Alzheimer’s disease. Most of the time, the cause of that forgetfulness is something more common and easily remedied.

Disturbances in mood and sleep are among the most common causes of memory problems in adults. Stress and anxiety make it harder to concentrate and lock in new information. Depression can hobble memory, as can alcohol consumption. Some medications can interfere with memory, as can some medical conditions.

A conversation with a doctor can help pinpoint the cause of memory slips—especially if the change is sudden or uncharacteristic. “If it’s worse than it was a few months ago, or somebody is asking you about it, that would definitely be something to see a doctor about,” says Dr. Anne Fabiny, chief of geriatrics at Cambridge Health Alliance and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Sometimes it’s useful to just give the brain a break. “As you get older, it may become more difficult to maintain a high level of attention for several things at once,” Dr. Fabiny says. “Dividing your attention can definitely cause you to think you are having memory problems.”

Read the full-length article: “The four horsemen of forgetfulness”

Also in the February 2013 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch:

  • Heartburn drug side effects: Should you worry?
  • How to get ready for a total knee replacement
  • Options when erectile dysfunction drugs don’t work
  • Do men need annual check-ups?

The Harvard Health Letter is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $16 per year. Subscribe at www.health.harvard.edu/mens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

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