Personalized Diets Based On Individual Genetic Make-up Offer Promise

research suggests that blanket

public dietary advice is not

the most effective technique

for improving public health.

“In employing this holistic approach

we hope to draw together cutting-edge research

and instigate a significant step forward

in the field of personalised nutrition”

We Bring Two Things To The Dinner Table:

Our Appetites And Our Genotypes. 

Creating a diet tailored specifically for an individual, according to their individual physical and genetic make-up is what Food4Me is all about.

Food4Me is a new, EU (FP7) funded project investigating the potential of this personalised nutrition. When the human genome sequence was launched in 2000, it introduced the possibility of personalisation in health care.

Such personalisation can be applied to nutrition, a key health determinant.

Personalized Nutrition

Studies have shown that individuals respond differently to various nutrients. For example, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, the ˜healthy fats” found in oily fish that are believed to protect against cardiovascular disease, have been found to be more beneficial in individuals with a particular genetic make-up (Ferguson et al., 2010).

The point is, we are all different, and so the way we respond to our diet is also different. Such research suggests that blanket public dietary advice is not the most effective technique for improving public health.

Rather than applying overarching dietary guidance to the whole population, personalised nutrition sets the individual apart to consider their specific physical and genetic characteristics. This practice has been touted as the future of nutrition with significant potential to improve public health.

The early promise has not quite lived up to this expectation however, and despite the efforts of numerous companies there has been limited success.

Food4Me will investigate the possibility of designing better diets based on a person’s genetic make-up. A renowned group of experts will examine the application of nutrigenomic research (studies of the effect of food on gene expression) to personalised nutrition. How can we use our understanding of food and our genes to design a better, healthier and more individual diet?

Food4Me project

Food4Me, a 4 year project coordinated by Professor Mike Gibney of the Institute of Food and Health, University College Dublin (UCD), will consider all aspects of personalised nutrition; from investigating consumer understanding to producing technologies for implementation and investigating gene expression in response to diet. “In employing this holistic approach we hope to draw together cutting-edge research and instigate a significant step forward in the field of personalised nutrition” said Gibney.

A major component of the study is a large multi-centre human intervention study investigating the effectiveness of personalised nutrition. The study will offer participants differing levels of dietary advice; tailored to individual physical characteristics, individual genetic make-up, as well as advice with no personalisation. Over a thousand subjects will be recruited from eight EU countries to take part in the study. Research to determine the effectiveness of personalised nutrition and develop appropriate technologies for its implementation will be supported by investigation of the public’s needs and perceptions.

All results will be consolidated in the design of business and value creation models for the development, production and distribution of personalised foods. These will be tested throughout the project in order to consider the feasibility of future personalised nutrition approaches. Ethical and legal issues will also be assessed and will help shape the framework for the outcomes of the consumer studies, business models and human intervention research.

The data gathered in the project will feed into the development of services to deliver personalised advice on food choice.

http://www.eufic.org/jpage/en/page/PRESS/fftid/New-EU-funded-project-changing-the-way-we-eat/

  • Full bibliographic informationFerguson, J., F., Phillips, C., M., McMonagle, J., Perez-Martinez, P., Shaw, D., I., Lovegrove, J., A., Helal, O., Defoort., C., Gielstad, I., M., F., Drevon, C., A., Blaak, E., E., Saris, W., H., M., Leszczynska-Golabek, I., Kiec-Wilk, B., Riserus, U., Karlstrom, B., Lopez-Miranda, J. and Roche, H., M. NOS3 gene polymorphisms are associated with risk markes of cardiovascular disease, and interact with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Atherosclerosis. 2010; 211(2):539-544.

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Half Of Americans Sweet On Sodas

Sweeteners are hard to escape. It’s also hard to escape the health consequences of becoming overly reliant on a substance that apparently, not enough of us are yet aware is killing us slowly.

Half Of Americans Sweet On The Perils Of Sugar

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recent statistics show half of Americans drink a soda or sugary beverage each day. We have gulped our way to a new milestone in that they include both adults and kids. So much for leading by example.

The American Diabetes Association’s Scientific Sessions suggest that drinking diet soda may be doing more harm than good.

Epidemiologists from the School of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio reported data showing that diet soft drink consumption is associated with increased waist circumference.

Related studies point to the illusion of the artificial

Diet soda users as a group experienced 70% greater increase in waist circumference compared with non-users. These results suggest aspartame exposure might potentially directly contribute to increased blood glucose levels. This in turn contributes to the associations observed between diet soda consumption and diabetes in humans.

With a majority of the population being obese, diabetic and increasingly unhealthy, it’s not so funny anymore to pitch junk to children so blatantly. First it was Joe Camel getting side lined, now Burger King says they are removing the King Mascot from the Throne.

Not to worry, researchers are working on an i–phone app to use with a tattoo that monitors glucose and sodium levels. Watch for more techno-bio feedback tools to learn appropriate healthy behaviors.

Researchers at Northeastern University are working on nano sensors tattooed under the skin. The sensors change shade, red for sodium and yellow for glucose. Not ready for humans just yet, but as they say, awareness is the first step to enlightenment. Measuring for it keeps us headed in the right direction. Hopefully we’ll get the message by the time it becomes a life and death matter,

Look at the labels of any packaged or processed food product. Sweeteners are hard to escape. It’s also hard to escape the health consequences of becoming overly reliant on a substance that apparently, not enough of us are yet aware of we all know is killing us slowly.Maybe the perils of sugar will become obvious to all of us. How about we stop subsidizing GMO corn processed high fructose corn syrup.

 

Plant Burgers Offer Novel Way To Eat Our Way Out Of Extinction

Plant Based Burgers Rival Real Deal

Since we’re not interested in putting a man on the moon anymore, it’s a good thing somebody has been paying attention to a much bigger ambition. Saving ourselves from extinction. It looks like we may have a way to eat our way out of trouble.

Ethan Brown, founder of Beyond Meat, says that the key to creating a meat-like experience using plants is replicating the composition of real meat: its protein, fat, and water.

→  Read full article

See Also:Cultured Meat Symposium Unveiled

Beyond Meat Plant Based GMO Free Burgers

“If you understand what goes into meat and the architecture of it, you can build a piece of meat right from plants.”

Video Games May Help Increase Fruit, Vegetable Intake

Fruits and Vegetables

Serious Video Games May Help Increase Fruit, Vegetable Intake

04/05/2016 06:56 GMT Elsevier

Using a serious video game, Squires Quest! II: Saving the Kingdom of Fivealot, researchers from the United States Department of Agriculture / Agricultural Research Service Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital evaluated how creating implementation intentions (i.e., specific plans) within the goal-setting component in the game helped fourth and fifth grade students improve fruit and vegetable intake at specific meals.
→  Read full article,

Full bibliographic information

“Meal-Specific Dietary Changes from Squires Quest! II: A Serious Video Game Intervention,” by Karen W. Cullen, DrPH, RD; Yan Liu, MS; Debbe I. Thompson, PhD (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2016.02.004), Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Volume 48, Issue 5 (May 2016), published by Elsevier.

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