Plant Based Food Options Are Sprouting Profits For Retailers

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

Plant Based Options Are Sprouting Growth for Retailers

FMCG AND RETAIL | 06-13-2018

From a consumption perspective, many would argue that there’s never been a better time to be a shopper. That’s because there’s something for everyone and every taste. And when it comes to nutrition, 37% of Americans say they’re following a specific diet this year, which is up from 35% last year and 29% in 2016. And with consumers narrowing their foci, brands and retailers need to stay tuned in—or risk missing out.

Once convenience is tossed into the mix, consumer choices expand into an ever growing universe of new, different or better. The food category has become ‘complicated’. Retailers persist in showing customers pictures of products on sale with no ‘why behind the buy’ story to give context to the purchase decision.

Retailers who do educate before selling, gain predictable and consistent profits. Content marketing has been tested and proven to outperform any other marketing program using sales circulars or ads. That’s the good news for retailers. This is the most fertile area for growth these days.

Amid the various nutrition programs on the market today, plant-based diets are gaining particular prominence. Notably, a Nielsen Homescan survey last year found that 39% of Americans are actively trying to eat more plant-based foods. To meet their goals, however, many shoppers aren’t looking to traditional plant-based staples like tofu, brown rice and granola. In fact, sales of traditional plant-based options were down 1.3% in the year ended April 7, 2018.

That’s not to say that growth in plant options is absent, however. Within the plant-based food space, innovation is booming, and an array of plant-based alternatives are posting significant sales growth.

In looking across the U.S., 6% of Americans say they follow a strictly vegetarian lifestyle, while 3% follow a strictly vegan lifestyle. Regardless of motivations, the number of consumers adopting vegetarian or vegan lifestyles is increasing, predominantly among young and diverse consumer groups. In looking across demographic groups, ethnic and young consumers express higher intentions to eat more plant-based foods:

African Americans are 48% more likely than the average U.S. consumer to incorporate plant-based foods.
Asian Americans are 47% more likely than the average U.S. consumer to incorporate plant-based foods.
Hispanic consumers are 46% more likely than the average U.S. consumer to incorporate plant-based foods.
Caucasian Millennials are 47% more likely than the average U.S. consumer to incorporate plant-based foods.

From a total store perspective, plant-based food options are no small potatoes. As of 2017, 19.5% of food and beverage dollars came from products that met a plant-based diet. And as a result of consumer interest, vegan (which excludes produce) and produce sales growth is outpacing total food and beverage sales.

Vegan and produce growth
In addition, vegan and produce options increased their dollar share by nearly 2% between 2014 and 2017.

Vegan and produce dollar share
Vegetarian and vegan offerings aren’t limited to solid foods, however, as most of us are well aware of the rise in dairy alternatives, particularly milk substitutes. And from a consumption perspective, Americans are going nuts for almond milk, which has posted a three-year combined annual growth rate of 8.2%.

Whether it be due to health, ethics or sustainability, the proportion of U.S. consumers that adhere to a vegetarian or vegan diet is growing. And that presents notable opportunity for brands and retailers looking for ways to capitalize on specific needs and desires among consumers opting for plant-based food and beverage options, particularly in cases where no or few options currently exist.

METHODOLOGY
The insights in this article were derived from the following sources:

Nielsen Retail Measurement Services
Nielsen Product Insider, powered by Label Insight, Latest 52 weeks ended Dec. 30, 2017
U.S. Homescan Panel Protein Survey, April 2017
The Nielsen Global Health and Ingredient-Sentiment Survey, 2016
Nielsen 2018 Health Shopper Survey

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Carb-Restricted Diet Battles Fatty Liver Disease

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

The researchers found that the metabolism of dangerous hepatic lipids was “strongly linked” to rapid increases in B vitamins and the bacteria that produce folic acid.

New details about how a carbohydrate-restricted diet improves metabolism were revealed in a study published today. This could lead to improved treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

15/02/2018 KTH The Royal Institute of Technology

A research team in Sweden examined  the effects of reduced carbohydrate consumption – without an accompanying reduction in calorie intake – by putting 10 subjects with obesity and high liver fat on a two-week diet. The study, which involved KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s SciLifeLab research center, combined clinical and big data analysis to determine the subsequent changes in metabolism and gut bacteria.

By doing so, they identified why the subjects showed “rapid and dramatic” reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, along with marked decreases in synthesis of hepatic fat. Published today in Cell Metabolism, the work was authored by researchers from KTH, University of Gothenburg and other international collaborators.

Adil Mardinoglu, a systems biology researcher at KTH, says that the subjects were restricted to an isocaloric, low-carbohydrate diet with increased protein content. The researchers found that the metabolism of dangerous hepatic lipids was “strongly linked” to rapid increases in B vitamins and the bacteria that produce folic acid.

This benefit was coupled by a reduction in the expression of genes that are involved in fatty acid synthesis, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism and fatty acid oxidation.

“A carbohydrate-restricted dietary intervention such as the one we used can be an efficient treatment strategy for a severe health problem, as medical science continues the development of new drugs,” Mardinoglu says.

The study relied upon a combination of systems medicine and advanced clinical studies, with close interaction between experts in systems medicine, basic scientists, nutritionists and clinicians. Combining forces enabled the team to apply a “multi-omics” approach, which means integrating multiple data sets from the body’s omes (genome, proteome, transcriptome, etc.) to identify biomarkers.

“We’ve moved from an era where scientists could work individually and command – in one laboratory – everything they needed, to a world that’s much more interactive,” Mardinoglu says.

Lead author Jan Boren, a professor at University of Gothenburg, says: “We found that the diet, independently of weight-loss, induced rapid and dramatic reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, and revealed hitherto unknown underlying molecular mechanisms.

“It’s important, however, to clarify that diets are complicated and that one type of diet does not fit everyone. For example, subjects with hypercholesterolemia should be careful.”
Liver fat is the earliest abnormality in the pathogenesis of both NAFLD and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) due to metabolic risk factors associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in the presence or absence of alcohol consumption.

Therefore, the strategies the research team identified could be used also for the treatment of AFLD patients, Boren says.

Full bibliographic information

Mardinoglu et al.,

An Integrated Understanding of the Rapid Metabolic Benefits of a Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet on Hepatic Steatosis in Humans,

Cell Metabolism (2018)

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2018.01.005

A Consumer’s Guide to Digestive Health

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Click Image to Read the Nutrition News Fiber Report

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

 Only 3% of Americans meet dietary fiber intake recommendations.

Thus, 97% of us are not eating enough fiber.

NHANES,National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
What 50 Grams Of Fiber Looks Like
High Fiber Foods
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

Feeling Full Of It?

Maybe you really are. The good news is that the key to your optimal health requires fiber.

In the United States and most other Western countries, diet-related chronic diseases (eg., heart disease, diabetes, obesity, etc.) represent the single largest cause of disease and death. They are epidemic in Westernized populations and typically afflict 50-65% of all adults.

In the US, these diseases cause seven of every 10 deaths. In addition, the annual tab amounts to 86% of all health care spending – or $258 trillion!

.

“All disease begins in the gut.” – Hippocrates

After almost 2,500 years of studies, research and tests, it turns out the ancient Greek physician commonly referred to as the “father of medicine” was pretty close when he made this declaration. Of course not every disease originates in the gut, but good digestion is the foundation for good health. When all functions as it should, we feel healthy, vibrant, and energetic.  When it doesn’t, we feel sluggish, uncomfortable and even ill.

According to a report by the National Institutes of Health, up to 70 million Americans have been diagnosed with some form of a digestive disorder. In fact, those numbers are on the rise. Add those with chronic problems yet to be officially diagnosed, and those with more occasional digestive problems and the list quickly grows to include just about everyone.

The good news is, there are a variety of health aids on the market designed to address and resolve many digestive issues and ensure a healthy gut. The bad news, you almost need to be a registered dietician or medical doctor in order to properly sort through the seemingly endless options.

Do I need fiber or a laxative? What is the difference between an internal cleanse and a detox? Can this be taken by men, women or both? Ugh! Before getting overwhelmed, check out this simple guide to help digest all the possibilities.

Starting with Fiber

Fiber is the indigestible part of plant foods that travels through the digestive system, absorbing water along the way and easing bowel movements. A diet high in fiber promotes a healthy digestive tract and increases regularity. Fiber can also create a feeling of fullness, a useful tool in weight control.

Additionally, a diet high in fiber can decrease your risk of hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and stroke. According to the Institute of Medicine, the recommended daily intake of dietary fiber is 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men. The problem is that most adults only get about half that, so fiber supplements are often recommended.

One of the most popular fiber supplements is psyllium, which comes from the ‘husk’ or outer coating of the psyllium plant’s seeds. On contact with water, psyllium thickens into a gel-like substance that acts like a broom to sweep waste from the digestive tract and colon.

“You want to avoid lower grade fiber products that grind the whole plant, including parts that are essentially fillers,” explains Craig Hays, Organic Chemist and Quality Assurance Manager at Yerba Prima (www.yerba.com), an innovator of dietary fiber and internal cleansing products. “Check the label to make sure that the psyllium plant seeds are used.”

Laxatives

If constipation is an issue, a fiber supplement alone may not be sufficient. If this is the case, a mild laxative may provide relief but should only be taken for a very short duration

Cascara Sagrada and Senna, two of the most common natural laxatives, both act on the colon to stimulate muscle contractio“In normal doses and for short periods of time they are effective,” says Hays. “If higher doses are taken they can over stimulate the colon and cause problems.”Senna or Cascara, taken along with fiber to provide bulk to your stool, makes for easier passage through the system. Some laxative formulations like Yerba Prima’s Fiber Plus Senna Powder, combine the two, along with other herbs designed to soothe the digestive system.

Detox

The digestive system is designed to expel toxins from our bodies. However, with the overwhelming amount of chemicals, pesticides, heavy metals, environmental toxins, as well as drugs, alcohol, processed foods and added sugars that we are exposed to daily can put undue stress on the liver and the body’s elimination capacity. Detoxification is a popular strategy for aiding this process.

One of the most effective ingredients for a safe, natural detox is bentonite, a natural volcanic clay that attracts toxins through adsorption and is taken in a solution or capsule form. The clay is not digested, but passes through the gastrointestinal tract, where it binds to toxins and carries them out of the body through the bowel.

“Bentonite attracts toxins like a magnet as it passes through the body’s digestive tract,” says Hays. “When combined with psyllium, it is even more effective because that ‘ball of toxins’ is swept out of the body by the fiber.”

Total Body Cleanse

Because exposure to environmental contaminants, including industrial pollution and heavy metals, is cumulative, many experts advise performing a total body cleanse on an annual or semi-annual basis. The goal is to remove accumulated chemicals through all the body’s channels of elimination: the bowels, kidneys, lungs, liver, and lymphatic system.

“People do a cleanse when they want to jumpstart their system and get back on a healthy track,” says Hays, whose company developed the first whole body internal cleanse.  “It is popular as part of a new year’s resolution, in preparation to a change in diet or when starting an exercise regimen.”

A cleanse can be achieved by taking many individual supplements, however, it is considerably easier (and cheaper!) to take a product that provides a complete range of desired health effect“. Just as you would not run your car until it breaks down without maintaining it, you should not do that to your body,” adds Hays.

Gender Specific Formulations

Because men and women have different physiological and nutritional needs, there are different requirements for men and women when it comes to internal cleanses.

Female consumers should look for internal cleansing systems that are designed to enhance good digestion, nutrient assimilation, waste and toxin elimination, energy stability and hormonal balance. Certain herbs and extracts have been used for thousands of years to ease menstrual- related issues – like Chaste-tree berry and Dong Quai Root extract. The combination helps women feel healthier and more energetic throughout the month.

Similarly for men, formulations that contain a common base of powerful cleansing supplements, along with gender specific ingredients, can protect and rebuild elimination systems leading to overall better health.  This includes saw palmetto for prostate health, as well as Asian ginseng and sarsaparilla root extract to support male vitality.

“Whether you are taking fiber, detoxing or doing a total body cleanse, it is all about taking care of yours digestive health so you can look and feel your best each and every day,” concludes Hays.

For more information of digestive health contact Yerba Prima; www.yerba.com, sales@yerbaprima.com, or call (800) 488-4339 or International +1 (541) 488-2228.

 

Carb-Restricted Diet Battles Fatty Liver Disease

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

The metabolism of dangerous hepatic lipids was “strongly linked” to rapid increases in B vitamins and the bacteria that produce folic acid.

 “We found that the diet, independently of weight-loss, induced rapid and dramatic reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, and revealed hitherto unknown underlying molecular mechanisms.”

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

Study Shows How A Carb-restricted Diet Battles Fatty Liver Disease

KTH The Royal Institute of Technology

New details about how a carbohydrate-restricted diet improves metabolism were revealed in a study published today, which could lead to improved treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

A research team in Sweden examined  the effects of reduced carbohydrate consumption – without an accompanying reduction in calorie intake – by putting 10 subjects with obesity and high liver fat on a two-week diet. The study, which involved KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s SciLifeLab research center, combined clinical and big data analysis to determine the subsequent changes in metabolism and gut bacteria.

By doing so, they identified why the subjects showed “rapid and dramatic” reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, along with marked decreases in synthesis of hepatic fat. Published today in Cell Metabolism, the work was authored by researchers from KTH, University of Gothenburg and other international collaborators.

Adil Mardinoglu, a systems biology researcher at KTH, says that the subjects were restricted to an isocaloric, low-carbohydrate diet with increased protein content. The researchers found that the metabolism of dangerous hepatic lipids was “strongly linked” to rapid increases in B vitamins and the bacteria that produce folic acid.

This benefit was coupled by a reduction in the expression of genes that are involved in fatty acid synthesis, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism and fatty acid oxidation.

“A carbohydrate-restricted dietary intervention such as the one we used can be an efficient treatment strategy for a severe health problem, as medical science continues the development of new drugs,” Mardinoglu says.

The study relied upon a combination of systems medicine and advanced clinical studies, with close interaction between experts in systems medicine, basic scientists, nutritionists and clinicians. Combining forces enabled the team to apply a “multi-omics” approach, which means integrating multiple data sets from the body’s omes (genome, proteome, transcriptome, etc.) to identify biomarkers.

“We’ve moved from an era where scientists could work individually and command – in one laboratory – everything they needed, to a world that’s much more interactive,” Mardinoglu says.

Lead author Jan Boren, a professor at University of Gothenburg, says: “We found that the diet, independently of weight-loss, induced rapid and dramatic reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, and revealed hitherto unknown underlying molecular mechanisms.

“It’s important, however, to clarify that diets are complicated and that one type of diet does not fit everyone. For example, subjects with hypercholesterolemia should be careful.”

Liver fat is the earliest abnormality in the pathogenesis of both NAFLD and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) due to metabolic risk factors associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in the presence or absence of alcohol consumption.

Therefore, the strategies the research team identified could be used also for the treatment of AFLD patients, Boren says.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2018.01.005

 

Plant-Based Foods Could Save A Country Billions

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“Our research demonstrates that increasing plant-based eating is cost-effective, reduces economic costs, such as hospital admissions and doctors’ bills, as well as increasing the number of healthy years people live, and enabling them to continue having an active life,”

Lieven Annemans

Professor of Health Economics at Ghent University,

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

Eating Our Landscape Could Prove To Be Profitable as Well as Healthy

14 February 2018 Ghent University

Billions of euro could be saved from a country’s annual health bill if more people can be persuaded to follow a plant-based diet, according to new research published in the Journal of Nutrition. Also society overall will benefit due to less absenteeism from work.

The study looked at the health and economic consequences of two plant-based eating patterns, a diet with a daily portion of soya foods and a Mediterranean-style diet.

The study suggests the British government could reduce its healthcare and societal costs over the next 20 years by £5.21 billion if just 10% of the UK population would emphasize plant-based foods in their diet. Cost savings could be as high as £7.54 billion if 10% of the UK population could be encouraged to incorporate soya products in their daily diet.

“Our research demonstrates that increasing plant-based eating is cost-effective, reduces economic costs, such as hospital admissions and doctors’ bills, as well as increasing the number of healthy years people live, and enabling them to continue having an active life,” said Lieven Annemans, professor of health economics at Ghent University, and the lead author of the paper. “Our study has the potential to contribute to the way healthy eating is promoted,” he added.

There are different approaches to plant-based eating, from Mediterranean-type diets through to vegetarian and veganism. Plant-based eating is in line with the latest government dietary guidelines, the Eatwell Guide. In other words, plant-based eating does not have to exclude all animal products, but places plant-based foods such as soya, fruits, vegetables, wholegrains, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils at the core of the diet.

The researchers carried out an extensive review of the scientific literature and concluded that both plant-based and soya eating patterns reduce the risk of diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and certain cancers. Diets containing soya demonstrated the most favorable health effects from the two evaluated plant-based food patterns.

The researchers calculated the impact of these plant-based food patterns on ‘quality adjusted life years’ (QALYs), which estimate the number of expected years of good health. To calculate disease costs, a societal perspective was taken, including direct and indirect costs. Direct costs are those directly associated with the disease or related conditions including costs related to diagnosis and treatment. Indirect costs include employment related elements such as absenteeism, and productivity loss due to sickness.

For the UK, a diet containing soya is estimated to yield 159 QALYs and 100 QALYs per 1,000 women and men, respectively. Similarly, adherence to a plant-based Mediterranean-type diet also results in living longer in good health and cost-savings to society.

Professor Ian Rowland, professor in nutrition from Reading University, supported the findings of the new study and commented: “Emphasizing plant-based foods in your diet can help to improve nutrition and meet current dietary recommendations. More plant-based eating helps against a variety of diseases which many people are currently confronted with. In addition to the personal health benefits, it can also help reduce society’s healthcare costs.”

This study provides yet more reasons to eat more plant-based foods and is in line with the UK ‘Eatwell guide’ which champions plant-based foods for good health and sustainability. It follows a report published by the Sustainable Food Trust in November – The Hidden Cost Of UK Food – which found that poor diets add 37p of healthcare costs to every £1 spent on food.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0899900717302861

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