Daily Coffee Halves Mortality Risk in Patients with Both HIV and HCV

This is a very exciting time for HCV research

as a cure that can eradicate the virus

is now available for all patients.

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

Siri Says, “I used to rise and shine.

But now I drink a cup of coffee and hope for the best.”

Three or More Cups of Coffee Daily Halves Mortality Risk in Patients with Both HIV and HCV

25 September 2017 Elsevier

Novel five-year study highlights importance of behaviors such as coffee drinking and not smoking on health and survival of HIV-infected patients, report investigators in the Journal of Hepatology

Patients infected by both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at specific risk of end-stage liver disease and greater risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In addition, HIV infection accelerates the progression of chronic hepatitis C to fibrosis and development of cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease.

In these HIV-HCV co-infected patients, drinking at least three cups of coffee each day halved the risk of all-cause mortality according to a new study published in the Journal of Hepatology.

This study is the first to investigate the relationship between coffee consumption and the risk of all-cause mortality in HIV-HCV co-infected patients. “This is a very exciting time for HCV research as a cure that can eradicate the virus is now available for all patients,” explained lead investigator Dominique Salmon-Céron, MD, PhD, of the Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hôpital Cochin, and Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. “However, even when cured of HCV, patients co-infected with HIV have a higher risk of death with respect to the general population, due to an accelerated aging process that may result from cancer, complications related to diabetes and to liver disease, and from cardiovascular events.”

Coffee is known to have anti-inflammatory and liver-protective properties. In the general population, drinking three or more cups of coffee a day has been found to be associated with a 14% reduction in the risk of all-cause mortality. This is probably due to the properties of polyphenols contained in coffee that can protect the liver and also reduce inflammation.

Investigators used data from a five-year follow-up of 1,028 HIV-HCV co-infected patients enrolled in the French national ANRS CO13-HEPAVIH cohort. ANRS CO13-HEPAVIH is an ongoing French nationwide prospective cohort of HIV-HCV co-infected patients that collects both medical and psychosocial/behavioral data over time via annual self-administered questionnaires.

At enrolment, one in four patients reported drinking at least three cups of coffee daily. Over the five years, 77 deaths occurred, almost half attributable to hepatitis C. However, the mortality risk was 80% lower in those who were cured of (i.e. who “cleared”) hepatitis C thanks to treatment.

Further analysis showed that drinking at least three cups of coffee daily was associated with a 50% reduction in mortality risk even after taking into account HCV clearance, HIV- and HCV-related factors, and other sociobehavioral factors, such as having a steady partner and not smoking.  Healthy behavior change should be promoted by physicians following HCV clearance.

This research highlights the importance of behaviors – coffee consumption and not smoking in particular – on reduced mortality risk. These results can help promote behavioral changes in HIV-HCV patients, which in turn can result in improved survival. With respect to coffee consumption, individuals who do not drink coffee because of caffeine can still benefit from the comparable anti-inflammatory effects of decaffeinated coffee.

First author Maria Patrizia Carrieri, PhD, of the HEPAVIH Study Group, Faculté de Médecine, Aix Marseille University, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Marseilles, France, observed that coffee consumption provides more protective effects on mortality in the HIV-HCV population than in the general population.

“The results of our study show that while curing HCV is fundamental, it must be complemented by behavioral changes if we are to improve health and survival in HIV-infected patients whether or not they cleared HCV. “I think we need to better monitor coffee consumption, together with other behaviors, such as alcohol use, smoking, physical activity, and to propose interventions to our patients which facilitate healthy behaviors even after HCV clearance. We also suggest that those patients who cannot tolerate a high intake of caffeine should consider drinking a few cups of decaffeinated coffee a day,” commented Dr. Salmon-Céron. “Accordingly, I believe that the benefits of coffee extracts and supplementing dietary intake with other anti-inflammatory compounds need to be evaluated in HIV-HCV patients.”

Attached files

  • Drinking three or more cups of coffee a day halves mortality risk from all causes in HIV-HCV co-infected patients.

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Coffee Consumption Lowers Tinnitus Incidence In Women

A Prospective Study of Caffeine Intake and Risk of Incident Tinnitus

Background

Caffeine is a commonly consumed substance that has been thought to play a role in the development of tinnitus, but prospective data are lacking. We prospectively evaluated the association between caffeine intake and self-reported tinnitus in a female cohort.

Methods

Participants were 65,085 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II, aged 30 to 44 years and without tinnitus at baseline in 1991, who completed questionnaires about lifestyle and medical history every 2 years and food frequency questionnaires every 4 years. Information on self-reported tinnitus and date of onset was obtained from the 2009 questionnaire, with cases defined as those reporting experiencing symptoms “a few days/week” or “daily.” Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models.

Results

At baseline, the mean age of the cohort was 36.3 years and the mean caffeine intake was 242.3 mg/d. After 18 years of follow-up, 5289 incident cases of tinnitus were reported. There was a significant inverse association between caffeine intake and the incidence of tinnitus. Compared with women with caffeine intake less than 150 mg/d (150 mg corresponds to ∼ one 8-ounce cup of coffee), the multivariable adjusted hazard ratios were 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.95) for those who consumed 450 to 599 mg/d and 0.79 (0.68-0.91) for those who consumed 600 mg/d or more.

Conclusions

In this prospective study, higher caffeine intake was associated with a lower risk of incident tinnitus in women.

References

 

Caffeine Against Alzheimer’s Disease

 

Caffeine Has Positive Effect On Tau Deposits In Alzheimer’s

As part of a German-French research project, a team led by  Dr. Christa E. Müller from the University of Bonn and Dr. David Blum from the University of Lille was able to demonstrate for the first time that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer’s disease. The two-years project was supported with 30,000 Euro from the non-profit Alzheimer Forschung Initiative e.V. (AFI) and with 50,000 Euro from the French Partner organization LECMA. The initial results were published in the online edition of the journal “Neurobiology of Aging.”

Tau deposits, along with beta-amyloid plaques, are among the characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease. These protein deposits disrupt the communication of the nerve cells in the brain and contribute to their degeneration. Despite intensive research there is no drug available to date  which can prevent this detrimental process. Based on  the results of Prof. Dr. Christa Müller from the University of Bonn, Dr. David Blum and their team, a new class of drugs may now be developed for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, blocks various receptors in the brain which are activated by adenosine. Initial results of the team of researchers had already indicated that the blockade of the adenosine receptor subtype A2A in particular could play an important role. Initially, Prof. Müller and her colleagues developed an A2A antagonist in ultrapure and water-soluble form (designated MSX-3). This compound had fewer adverse effects than caffeine since it only blocks only the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, and at the same time it is significantly more effective. Over several weeks, the researchers then treated genetically altered mice with the A2A antagonist. The mice had an altered tau protein which, without therapy, leads to the early development of Alzheimer’s symptoms.

In comparison to a control group which only received a placebo, the treated animals achieved significantly better results on memory tests. The A2A antagonist displayed positive effects in particular on spatial memory. Also, an amelioration of the pathogenic processes was demonstrated in the hippocampus, which is the site of memory in rodents.

“We have taken a good step forward,” says Prof. Müller. “The results of the study are truly promising, since we were able to show for the first time that A2A adenosine receptor antagonists actually have very positive effects in an animal model simulating hallmark characteristics and progression of  the disease. And the adverse effects are minor.”

The researchers now want to test the A2A antagonist in additional animal models. If the results are positive, a clinical study may follow. “Patience is required until A2A adenosine receptor antagonists are approved as new therapeutic agents for Alzheimer’s disease. But I am optimistic that clinical studies will be performed,” says Prof. Müller.

Attached files

  • Characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease: The tau protein. (c) Photo: Alzheimer Forschung Initiative e.V.

 

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Greater Coffee Intake Protects Against Type 2 Diabetes

Individuals who increased their daily consumption of coffee by more than a cup over time had an 11% reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with people whose consumption stayed the same, according to a study in the journal Diabetologia. Individuals who reduced their coffee intake by more than a cup a day had a 17% higher risk of diabetes.

 

Smiley Face LatteNeed an excuse to drink yet another cup of coffee today?  A new study suggests that increasing coffee consumption may decrease the risk for type 2 diabetes.

The apparent relationship between coffee and type 2 diabetes is not new.  Previous studies have found that drinking a few cups or more each day may lower your risk – with each subsequent cup nudging up the benefit.

This most recent study, published in the journal Diabetologia, was more concerned with how changing coffee consumption – either increasing it or decreasing it over time – might affect your risk.

The conclusion: People who upped their consumption by more than a cup per day had an 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared with people whose consumption held steady.  Decreasing coffee consumption by the same amount – more than a cup a day – was associated with a 17% increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

The data is based on an analysis of more than 120,000 health professionals already being followed observationally long term.  Researchers looked at the study participants’ coffee drinking habits across four years to reach their conclusions.

Just how much coffee each day provides a benefit?

“For type 2 diabetes, up to six cups per day is associated with lower risk,” said Shilpa Bhupathiraju, a research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health and lead study author, citing previous research. “As long as coffee doesn’t give you tremors, doesn’t make you jittery, it is associated with a lot of health benefits.”

In the case of diabetes, the reasons behind the supposed protection conferred by coffee are not clear, but there are theories based on animal research.

One involves chemicals present in coffee – phenolic compounds and lignans – that may improve glucose metabolism, according to Bhupathiraju.  She added that coffee is rich in magnesium, which is also associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

Coffee drinking linked to longer life

Wait, though.  Before you scramble out to purchase your fourth latte of the day, it is important to note that the type of coffee matters.

Lattes and other types of specialty drinks – often laden with sugar – were not studied.  The type of coffee involved in this study tended to be a simple eight-ounce cup of black coffee containing about 100 milligrams of caffeine.

“People think of (increasing their intake) as going and drinking an extra blended drink,” said Bhupathiraju.  “We are not talking about ‘frappuchinos’ or lattes.  It’s black coffee with milk and sugar.”

Coffee good for you, but it’s OK to hold back

And while coffee may be associated with a reduction in some chronic diseases (not just diabetes, but cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, and – according to a New England Journal of Medicine study – with a longer life, overall) scientists are still  reluctant to call coffee a panacea.

That doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy one more cup in the meantime.

 

Cardiologist Warns Coffee Heart Health Study Doesn’t Apply To Energy Drinks

The urge to be healthy is a powerful one. Marketers are well aware of this human drive and they often take full advantage of our willingness to try anything that offers a benefit. Nothing wrong with that. Just don’t forget to read the fine print.

By Ben Bouckley+, 27-Nov-2013

Cup of Coffee Sitting on Coffee BeansEminent cardiologist Gordon Tomaselli has warned against applying the results of a small study linking caffeinated coffee with better blood vessel function to other products such as energy drinks.

It often happens that if something is shown to be of benefit, others jump on the band wagon to claim those benefits by association. Remember all the fuss over red wine’s health benefits? Resveratrol, the substance from grape seeds was studied. Pretty soon everyone started believing red wine was a health food. (It can be in moderation).  This is  the point that is often missed in many cases involving food and nutritional supplements.

In the case of energy drinks, the beverage industry is looking for anything that offers a ray of hope to stave off increased regulation. Consumers require some perspective when the conversation turns to regulation.

Nine out of ten poisoning deaths in the U.S.  related to prescription drugs. In 2006, 275 adverse supplement reactions were reported. Of those 275 dietary supplements calls, 41% involved symptomatic exposures; and two-thirds were rated as probably or possibly related to supplement use. Eight adverse events required hospital admission. Sympathomimetic toxicity was most common, with caffeine products accounting for 47%.

So it’s not surprising that a small study showing that coffee may help perk up your blood vessels gets taken out of contextMonster Rehab and gets applied to an entire beverage category. After all, it’s caffeine and caffeine is good. Must be true that more caffeine is better.

It follows that products with caffeine or caffeine related substances would jump on the band wagon to tout the health benefits even if none exist.  Coffee is a natural substance with complex phytonutrients. Those substances work synergistically in our bodies to deliver the benefits to human health. Just because a product formulation includes healthy individual ingredients, it doesn’t necessarily follow that the consumer is getting the same health benefits those substances were proven to have.

 

 

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