How ”Extreme Levels” of Monsanto’s Herbicide Roundup in Food Became the Industry Norm

Vitamins, Minerals and Roundup

TruthOut
By Thomas Bøhn and Marek Cuhra

Food and feed quality are crucial to human and animal health. Quality can be defined as sufficiency of appropriate minerals, vitamins and fats, etc. but it also includes the absence of toxins, whether man-made or from other sources. Surprisingly, almost no data exist in the scientific literature on herbicide residues in herbicide tolerant genetically modified (GM) plants, even after nearly 20 years on the market.

One of the supposed benefits of genetically modified crops was supposed to be a reduction in pesticide use. So how’s that working out?

The global market for agrochemicals was valued at USD 207.5 billion in 2014. It is projected to reach USD 250.5 billion by 2020, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.2% from 2015 to 2020.

Asia-Pacific dominated the global market with a share of around 36.7%. The European region is expected to be the fastest-growing market in the near future, for the growing concentration of farmers towards technology driven agriculture practices.

So what is the recommended daily dose of toxic pesticides?
Read More >>>

Swiss Chard Fritters With Feta, Fennel and Radish

This recipe from the New Orleans-based restaurant pairs crisp, lemony Swiss chard fritters with creamy feta and a radish-fennel salad.

From the Wall Street Journal.

There’s no way to lose with these ingredients, especially when you deep fry the fritters in ghee.  You probably don’t need three inches of oil either. That sounds like something a pro would do.

With a Summer veggie garden largess, swiss chard, radishes and fennel are always more abundant than we can eat. We saw this recipe and decided to take a page from the best of our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) organizations and share recipes for the goodies being distributed to the community. Feel free to play around with the ingredients and experiment with what’s growing in your garden.

ZING BEARERS | Dill, mint and lemon zest mixed into the batter brighten the earthy flavor of the Swiss chard. Christopher Testani for The Wall Street Journal, Food Styling by Heather Meldrom, Prop Styling by Stephanie Hanes

The Chef: Susan Spicer

Her Restaurants: Bayona and Mondo, both in New Orleans

What She’s Known For: Bringing easygoing grace to fine dining in the Crescent City. Delivering global flavors with classical-French finesse.

SUSAN SPICER RUNS a democratic kitchen. “It’s the stone soup approach,” she said. “Everyone has something to add. I want cooks to feel invested.” She credits Amarys Herndon, her sous-chef at Bayona, for this dish of chard fritters with whipped feta and a fennel-radish salad. “Amarys made this for a special one night, and I was like, ‘That is the best thing I have ever tasted with chard,’ ” she said. “Though I like greens, chard is probably my least favorite; it can taste too earthy. But these fritters were lighter than I expected. They really elevated the chard experience.” The batter, made of shredded chard, beaten egg and chickpea flour, quickly fries up into airy puffs, crisp on the outside and creamy within. Finding the right way to complete the plate was largely intuitive. “The fritters felt Greek to me,” Ms. Spicer explained. “That’s why we used feta and lemon in the sauce.” The shaved radish and fennel provide needed contrast: “If we do something fried, we like to put a nice, fresh element in there too

 

 

Ingredients

Swiss Chard Fritters With Feta, Fennel and Radish

Total Time: 35 minutes Serves: 4

2 bunches Swiss chard, stems removed and leaves roughly chopped

1 cup chickpea flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

3 eggs

½ cup soda water

1 tablespoon lemon zest, plus juice of half a lemon

1 teaspoon finely grated garlic

2 tablespoons finely chopped dill, plus sprigs for garnish

2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper

½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Olive oil, for frying and drizzling

1 cup feta cheese, at room temperature

½ cup cream cheese, at room temperature

6 radishes, thinly sliced

2 small fennel bulbs, thinly sliced

 

Directions

1. In a food processor, pulse chard until finely shredded. Remove ⅔ of chard and set aside in a large bowl.

2. Add chickpea flour, baking powder, baking soda, eggs and soda water to chard remaining in food processor. Process until evenly mixed, about 1 minute.

3. Scrape chard purée into large bowl with shredded chard. Add lemon zest, garlic, dill, mint, cinnamon, Aleppo pepper and nutmeg to bowl and fold everything together. Season with salt and pepper. Set batter aside.

4. In a medium pot over medium-high heat, bring 3 inches oil to 350 degrees. Use a deep-fat or candy thermometer to monitor temperature and keep it steady throughout cooking.

5. Meanwhile, clean bowl of food processor. Add feta and cream cheese and process until fluffy. Season with lemon juice and salt. Set aside. In a medium bowl, toss radishes and fennel slices with a squeeze of lemon juice, a light drizzle of olive oil and salt to taste. Set aside.

6. Use a ladle to add 3 tablespoons batter to oil. Working in batches, fry 4 fritters at a time until crisp and puffy, about 2 minutes per side. Use a slotted spoon to transfer fritters to a paper-towel-lined plate and season with salt.

7. To serve: Smear feta spread onto each plate. Place 2-3 fritters and some fennel-radish salad alongside. Garnish with dill sprigs.

 

Black Raspberry Improves Cardiovascular Risk In Metabolic Syndrome

Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries

Black Raspberry Improves Cardiovascular Risk in Metabolic Syndrome

28/04/2016 19:51 GMT Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers

A new study shows that black raspberry extract can significantly lower a key measure of arterial stiffness-an indicator of cardiovascular disease. Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries, according to the study published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers (http://www.liebertpub..com/). The article is available free on the Journal of Medicinal Food (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jmf.2015.3563) website until May 28, 2016.
→  Read full article

Full bibliographic information Black Raspberry Extract Increased Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improved Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Jeong Han Saem, Kim Sohyeon, Hong Soon Jun, Choi Seung Cheol, Choi Ji-Hyun, Kim Jong-Ho, Park Chi-Yeon, Cho Jae Young, Lee Tae-Bum, Kwon Ji-Wung, Joo Hyung Joon, Park Jae Hyoung, Yu Cheol Woong, and Lim Do-Sun. Journal of Medicinal Food. April 2016, 19(4): 346-352. doi:10.1089/jmf.2015.3563.
Published in Volume: 19 Issue 4: April 13, 2016
Online Ahead of Print: February 18, 2016

Caffeine Against Alzheimer’s Disease

 

Caffeine Has Positive Effect On Tau Deposits In Alzheimer’s

As part of a German-French research project, a team led by  Dr. Christa E. Müller from the University of Bonn and Dr. David Blum from the University of Lille was able to demonstrate for the first time that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer’s disease. The two-years project was supported with 30,000 Euro from the non-profit Alzheimer Forschung Initiative e.V. (AFI) and with 50,000 Euro from the French Partner organization LECMA. The initial results were published in the online edition of the journal “Neurobiology of Aging.”

Tau deposits, along with beta-amyloid plaques, are among the characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease. These protein deposits disrupt the communication of the nerve cells in the brain and contribute to their degeneration. Despite intensive research there is no drug available to date  which can prevent this detrimental process. Based on  the results of Prof. Dr. Christa Müller from the University of Bonn, Dr. David Blum and their team, a new class of drugs may now be developed for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, blocks various receptors in the brain which are activated by adenosine. Initial results of the team of researchers had already indicated that the blockade of the adenosine receptor subtype A2A in particular could play an important role. Initially, Prof. Müller and her colleagues developed an A2A antagonist in ultrapure and water-soluble form (designated MSX-3). This compound had fewer adverse effects than caffeine since it only blocks only the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, and at the same time it is significantly more effective. Over several weeks, the researchers then treated genetically altered mice with the A2A antagonist. The mice had an altered tau protein which, without therapy, leads to the early development of Alzheimer’s symptoms.

In comparison to a control group which only received a placebo, the treated animals achieved significantly better results on memory tests. The A2A antagonist displayed positive effects in particular on spatial memory. Also, an amelioration of the pathogenic processes was demonstrated in the hippocampus, which is the site of memory in rodents.

“We have taken a good step forward,” says Prof. Müller. “The results of the study are truly promising, since we were able to show for the first time that A2A adenosine receptor antagonists actually have very positive effects in an animal model simulating hallmark characteristics and progression of  the disease. And the adverse effects are minor.”

The researchers now want to test the A2A antagonist in additional animal models. If the results are positive, a clinical study may follow. “Patience is required until A2A adenosine receptor antagonists are approved as new therapeutic agents for Alzheimer’s disease. But I am optimistic that clinical studies will be performed,” says Prof. Müller.

Attached files

  • Characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease: The tau protein. (c) Photo: Alzheimer Forschung Initiative e.V.

 

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