Get Fit In 30 Minutes A Day Without A Gym Membership

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Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

You’ll burn just as many calories

from three ten minute sessions

of brisk walking as you would from

a straight half-hour block.

What Benefits Come With 30 Minutes Of Exercise?

One unfortunate result of our modern lifestyle has been a rise in health problems such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease all related to a lack of exercise.

If you worry about not getting enough exercise every day, don’t feel alone. More people are leading sedentary lives nowadays than ever before. Finding thirty minutes a day for exercise is something everyone can do. It’s on you to make it happen. We all deal with the same circumstances and love convenience.

Modern technology has done it to us, in large part: our modes of transportation, our numerous sit-down desk jobs, and our abundance of labor-saving devices like remote controls, escalators and riding mowers have all played their part in removing opportunities that people in previous generations found to exert themselves physically.

Capture Daily Lost Opportunities For Keeping Physically Fit

The good news is you can learn to capture lost opportunities for keeping physically fit without spending hours each week at the gym in order to accomplish it.

If you do spend hours each week in the gym, good for you. For those who don’t, or mean to but don’t, or don’t even think about going anymore, this is for you. Negative Emotions Outweigh Intent to Exercise at Health Clubs: The paradox between recognizing the importance of exercise for weight control and not exercising.

As little as thirty minutes a day devoted to moderate exertion can greatly improve your overall health.

And those thirty minutes can even be divided up throughout the day. You’ll burn just as many calories from three ten minute sessions of brisk walking as you would from a straight half-hour block.

Paying Attention To Opportunities To Move

Getting the biggest bang from your exercise starts with paying attention to opportunities to move. The only way that’s likely to happen is if you have something at stake.

In some of the latest research findings on exercise, a new study, published in The Journal of Physiology, shows that short bursts of very intense exercise — equivalent to only a few minutes per day — can produce the same results as traditional endurance training. For some, “No time to exercise” is no excuse. In fact, exercise causes epigenetic changes to fat cells.

A word to the wise to our adolescents and the school boards that have eliminated any meaningful physical fitness, Lower IQ And Poorer Cardiovascular Fitness In Teen Years Increase Risk Early-Onset Dementia

We have a global problem. Every year  57,100 children who started primary school in England at a healthy weight end up obese or overweight by the time they leave, according to new statistics.

Active Body, Active Mind

For our rapidly growing population of seniors, move it or lose has been scientifically validated once more. The secret to a younger brain may lie in exercising your body./

In addition to helping with weight control, exercise

  • would lower high blood pressure,
  • reduce the risk of chronic problems such as
  • heart disease and
  • colon cancer,
  • improve your circulation and
  • overall energy level, and
  • relieve stress and
  • promote a more positive state of mind.

Other exercises that can bring you similar benefits include bicycling, dancing, hiking and swimming. Even normal chores like mowing the lawn, raking leaves, washing your car, and vacuuming can be used as opportunities for increasing your heart rate and giving your muscles the activity that they yearn for.

Motivation, Mindfulness, Movement

You can achieve all of this without having to sacrifice any of your other daily commitments. The first step to forming an exercise strategy is to examine the way that you typically spend your time, and then isolate blocks that can be utilized for movement and exertion.

This can be done in small ways, such as getting off the bus a block early in order to fit in a brisk walk before work. Coffee breaks and lunch breaks may also provide openings for walks.

One-on-one meetings can be accomplished on foot, and cell phones make it possible for us to keep up with important calls while on the go, too.

Just bringing the idea of exercise more into the forefront of your consciousness will help you to find times during the day to devote to it. If we honestly log our time, most of us will probably discover that we devote a lot more of it to sitting than we really have to.Scientists at Loughborough University have found exercising is more effective than food restriction in helping limit daily calorie consumption.

Remember, it only has to be moderately intensive, not exhausting. And thirty minutes divided up throughout the day is enough to positively impact your health.

Identify the sedentary aspects of your lifestyle that could feasible be turned into activity. Another strategy is to take light activities and make them more engaging. For example, tackle the lawn with a push mower instead of a power mower, or till your garden with hand tools instead of a rototiller. Any strategy that works for you is right for you. Music Increases Exercise Endurance By 15%

Physical activity is absolutely essential to our health and well-being. No matter how busy our lives may be, or how sedentary our jobs, we have to be creative in finding ways to incorporate activity into our daily routines.

Move it or lose it is a fundamental rule for playing the Is It Healthy? Game.

 

 

Schools Find Physical Education Improves Academics

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Educating the Student Body: Taking Physical Activity and Physical Education to School

National Institute of Health

It seems like common sense that exercise helps every body function, including cognitive brain function. Scientists may agree with common sense, but they tend to like evidence.

That means lots of experiments to test and verify their assumptions. When it comes to physical activity and academic performance, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that maybe we should be spending more school time working the body instead of constantly testing the brain to see how well it withstands boredom.

Evidence suggests that increasing physical activity and physical fitness may improve academic performance. Additionally, Available evidence suggests that mathematics and reading are the academic topics that are most influenced by physical activity.

Basic cognitive functions related to attention and memory facilitate learning, and these functions are enhanced by physical activity and higher aerobic fitness.

Single sessions of and long-term participation in physical activity improve cognitive performance and brain health. Children who participate in vigorous- or moderate-intensity physical activity benefit the most.

These and tons of other research results can be found in:

Committee on Physical Activity and Physical Education in the School Environment; Food and Nutrition Board; Institute of Medicine; Kohl HW III, Cook HD, editors.
Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2013 Oct 30.
Move it or lose it remains our best guideline for cognitive function, health and longevity.

→  Read full article

Exercise Causes Epigenetic Changes To Fat Cells

A Comprehensive Map of AncestryDNA Ethnicity Regions

Altered DNA methylation as a result of physical activity could be one of the mechanisms of how these genes affect the risk of disease.

 

Exercise, even in small doses, changes the expression of our innate DNA. New research from Lund University in Sweden has described for the first time what happens on an epigenetic level in fat cells when we undertake physical activity.

“Our study shows the positive effects of exercise, because the epigenetic pattern of genes that affect fat storage in the body changes”, says Charlotte Ling, Associate Professor at Lund University Diabetes Centre.

The cells of the body contain DNA, which contains genes. We inherit our genes and they cannot be changed. The genes, however, have ‘methyl groups’ attached which affect what is known as ‘gene expression’ – whether the genes are activated or deactivated. The methyl groups can be influenced in various ways, through exercise, diet and lifestyle, in a process known as ‘DNA methylation’. This is epigenetics, a relatively new research field that in recent years has attracted more and more attention.

In the study, the researchers investigated what happened to the methyl groups in the fat cells of 23 slightly overweight, healthy men aged around 35 who had not previously engaged in any physical activity, when they regularly attended spinning and aerobics classes over a six-month period.

“They were supposed to attend three sessions a week, but they went on average 1.8 times”, says Tina Rönn, Associate Researcher at Lund University.

Using technology that analyses 480,000 positions throughout the genome, they could see that epigenetic changes had taken place in 7,000 genes (an individual has 20–25 000 genes). They then went on to look specifically at the methylation in genes linked to type 2 diabetes and obesity.

“We found changes in those genes too, which suggests that altered DNA methylation as a result of physical activity could be one of the mechanisms of how these genes affect the risk of disease”, says Tina Rönn, adding that this has never before been studied in fat cells and that they now have a map of the DNA methylome in fat.

In the laboratory, the researchers were able to confirm the findings in vitro (studying cell cultures in test tubes) by deactivating certain genes and thus reducing their expression. This resulted in changes in fat storage in fat cells.

 

19 Is the New 60

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Activity levels at the end of adolescence were alarmingly low, and by age 19, they were comparable to 60-year-olds

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A child in motion tends to stay in motion. Some research has found that kids are more physically active when they play on their own than in organized sports.

They also would be safe at schools, no matter how dicey the neighborhood. Leonore Skenazy, WSJ

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How do we modify daily schedules, in schools for example, to be more conducive to increasing physical activity?”

 

Here’s the big answer, as simple as it is cheap: after-school recess. Keep schools open till 6 every night. Give kids the run of the gym.

 

Follow the lead of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and open up the playgrounds, too. Put out some balls and chalk and even some big cardboard boxes.

 

Have an adult on the premises (with an EpiPen). But otherwise, let kids figure out their own fun. Leonore Skenazy, WSJ

19-Year-Olds As Sedentary As 60-Year-Olds, Study Suggests

John Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health

Teen Years Represent Highest Risk For Inactivity

Physical activity among children and teens is lower than previously thought, and, in another surprise finding, young adults after the age of 20 show the only increases in activity over the lifespan, suggests a study conducted by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. And, the study found, starting at age 35, activity levels declined through midlife and older adulthood.

The study also identified different times throughout the day when activity was highest and lowest, across age groups and between males and females. These patterns, the researchers say, could inform programs aimed at increasing physical activity by targeting not only age groups but times with the least activity, such as during the morning for children and adolescents.

The findings, which were published online June 1 in the journal, Preventive Medicine, come amid heightened concern that exercise deficits are contributing to the growing obesity epidemic, particularly among children and teens.

“Activity levels at the end of adolescence were alarmingly low, and by age 19, they were comparable to 60-year-olds,” says the study’s senior author, Vadim Zipunnikov, assistant professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of Biostatistics. “For school-age children, the primary window for activity was the afternoon between two and six P.M. So the big question is how do we modify daily schedules, in schools for example, to be more conducive to increasing physical activity?”

For their study, the researchers used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 survey cycles. The 12,529 participants wore tracking devices for seven straight days, removing them for only bathing and at bedtime. The devices measured how much time participants were sedentary or engaged in light or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

The researchers broke down findings into five age groups: children (ages six to 11); adolescents (ages 12 to 19); young adults (ages 20 to 29); adults at midlife (ages 31 to 59); and older adults (age 60 through age 84). Forty-nine percent were male, the rest female.

Activity among 20-somethings, the only age group that saw an increase in activity levels, was spread out throughout the day, with an increase in physical activity in the early morning, compared to younger adolescents. The increase may be related to starting full-time work and other life transitions.

For all age groups, males generally had higher activity levels than females, particularly high-intensity activity, but after midlife, these levels dropped off sharply compared to females. Among adults 60 years and older, males were more sedentary and had lower light-intensity activity levels than females.

The study confirmed that recommended guidelines were not being met. For instance, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity a day for children ages five to 17 years. The study found that more than 25 percent of boys and 50 percent of girls ages six to 11 and more than 50 percent of male and 75 percent of female adolescents ages 12 to 19 had not met the WHO recommendation.

While WHO formulates its recommendations in terms of moderate-to-vigorous activity, the researchers say there is a growing consensus for the benefits of reducing sedentary behavior and increasing even low-intensity levels of physical activity.

“The goal of campaigns aimed at increasing physical activity has focused on increasing higher-intensity exercise,” says Zipunnikov. “Our study suggests that these efforts should consider time of day and also focus on increasing lower-intensity physical activity and reducing inactivity.”

“Re-evaluating the effect of age on physical activity over the lifespan” was written by Vijay R. Varma, Debangan Dey, Andrew Leroux, Junrui Di, Jacek Urbanek, Luo Xiao and Vadim Zipunnikov.

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants 5R01HL123407-02, 5R01AG049872-02, 5R01AG050507-02). Vijay R. Varma was supported by the Intramural Research Program, the National Institute of Aging.

→  Read full article

Declining Muscle Mass With Aging Not Inevitable

Older Dudes Can Still Build Muscle

Declining muscle mass is part of aging, but not inevitable,

March 2016 Harvard Men’s Health Watch

Move it or lose it is still part of the program. From building bone density to lean muscle mass, exercise is a given.

Boston, MA — Age-related muscle loss, called sarcopenia, is a natural part of getting older. After age 30, men begin to lose as much as 3% to 5% of their muscle mass per decade. In fact, most men will lose about 30% of their muscle mass during their lifetime. Less muscle means greater weakness and less mobility, both of which may increase a person’s risk of falls and fractures.

But just because a man loses muscle mass does not mean it is gone forever, according to the March 2016issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch. “Older men can indeed increase muscle mass lost as a consequence of aging,” says Dr. Thomas W. Storer, director of the exercise physiology and physical function lab at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “It takes dedication and a plan, but it is never too late to rebuild muscle and maintain it.”

One of the best ways to build muscle mass is progressive resistance training, or PRT, says Dr. Storer. PRT gradually increases workout volume—weight, reps, and sets—as strength and endurance improve. This approach builds muscle while helping to avoid exercise plateaus.

Diet is equally important, adds Dr. Storer. Research suggests older adults need higher amounts of protein in their diet, which the body breaks down into amino acids to use for muscle growth.

To learn more about how to increase muscle mass with PRT and protein, read the full-length article:“Preserve your muscle mass”

Also in the March 2016 issue of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch:

  • Gain extra benefits from a lower blood pressure
  • Foster stronger social connections
  • Treat and prevent sciatic pain
  • How to prepare for your physical exam

The Harvard Men’s Health Watch is available from Harvard Health Publications, the publishing division of Harvard Medical School, for $20 per year. Subscribe at www.health.harvard.edu/mens or by calling 877-649-9457 (toll-free).

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