What You Don’t Know About Vitamin K2 Could Save Your Life

Vitamin K2 Nutrition News Cover

Is Vitamin K2 the Next D3?

The implications of Vitamin K2’s importance to human health can’t be understated. The connection between weak bones and arterial plaque has a direct relationship to Vitamin K2. Michael Murray offers some additional Vitamin K2 primer facts in his article at Vitamin Retailer Magazine. Watch for Vitamin K2 as the next issue from Nutrition News
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Increase Your Bone Density With These Supplements

Steve just uploaded his latest podcast on how to build strong healthy bones for a lifetime. Thanks Steve.

“My wife increased her bone density by 7 % in 7 years.”

Steve LankfordI have worked with a lot of women regarding their bone health. It is one of the major concerns for women as they age. I know from personal experience as my wife went from osteopenia to osteoporosis by her mid 50s. This occurred even though she was on a quality bone support formula. She had the same result as thousands of other women who we desperate to stop the bone loss. Something was wrong.

The nutrients were all the reported required nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, vitamins D, B6 etc. These were the better of the formulas available in the early 2000s. My wife was looking for a solution that did not involve the drugs.

It was at this time that we learned something new about osteoporosis. We learned that strontium is used as a treatment for osteoporosis in some parts of the world. We learned of another nutrient called ipriflavone which has a similar benefit, and we were all learning about the importance of higher dose vitamin D3. So these were added to her supplement program. Her doctor was skeptical and wanted her to take a bisphosphonate bone building drug. No, thank you. As a result, her bone density was increased by nearly 4 percent in 4 years. Wow. She was then 60 years old and building bone.

Around 2010 we began to learn more about bone support nutrients.We discovered BioSil (orthosilisic acid) a specific Building Healthy Bones for Lifeform of collagen building silica. And we learned about vitamin K2. And so these were added to her program. The result after 2 more years was another 3 percent improvement in bone density. She is up 7 % in 7 years. She is soon due for her next bone density scan. Will this trend continue? It’s been an exciting result so far, and we anticipate continued benefit.

This is an expensive program to follow if you take everything my wife takes. So here is my list in declining order of importance. I have no basis for this other than personal experience of my wife and other women I have advised. You need to determine the program that you are comfortable with and can afford.

  • A high quality natural bone support formula – if you aren’t sure visit a knowledgeable health food store. Print Bone Health Article PDFThere are now bone building formulas that include higher amounts of vitamin D3 and added K2. Some even include strontium as a separate formula. These may be the more cost effective but somewhat limited way to go. Look for quality brands and then compare formulas and price.
  • Vitamin D3 – Get tested and the adjust to the optimum dose for you.
  • Vitamin K2 – 80 to 100 mcg. per day.
  • BioSil – follow label directions.
  • Strontium – 680 mg. per day, taken apart from calcium.
  • ipriflavone – follow label directions.

In this podcast, I will give you my best advice for women who are concerned about osteoporosis. You can also print out a copy of my paper entitled “A Natural Approach to Bone Health”. You will find in depth interview on vitamin D3, K2 and BioSil at HealthQuestPodcast.com. Search the TAG INDEX to easily find all related content.

From: steve@healthquestpodcast.com

PO Box 372
Suamico, WI 54173

Vitamin K Intake Helpful To Bone Health

Bone. 2011 Jun 1;48(6):1313-8. Epub 2011 Apr 5.

Dietary vitamin K intake is associated with bone quantitative ultrasound measurements but not with bone peripheral biochemical markers in elderly men and women.

Source

Human Nutrition Unit, Facultat de Medicina i Ciències de la Salut, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Reus, Spain. monica.bullo@urv.cat

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin K may have a protective role against bone loss and osteoporotic fractures associated to aging, although data in humans are inconsistent and the mechanisms involved are still unknown. The main objective of the study was to assess the associations between vitamin K intake, bone density, bone structure quality and biochemical bone metabolism markers in elderly subjects. We also analyzed the relationship between changes in vitamin K intake and the evolution of bone quality markers after two years of follow-up.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis was carried out on 365 elderly subjects, 200 of whom were also included in a 2-year longitudinal follow-up study. Usual dietary intakes were assessed using a semi-quantitative 137-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Vitamin K intake was estimated using the USDA database. Bone biochemical markers were measured in a subset of 125 subjects. Quantitative ultrasound assessment (QUS) was performed at the calcaneus to estimate bone mineral density (BMD), speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and the quantitative ultrasound index (QUI).

RESULTS:

Dietary intake of vitamin K was significantly associated with higher BMD and better QUS. No significant associations were found between vitamin K intake and bone biochemical markers. Those subjects who increased their vitamin K intake showed a lower loss of BMD, a lower decrease in SOS and a nonsignificant increase in BUA.

CONCLUSIONS:

High dietary vitamin K intake was associated with superior bone properties. Moreover, an increase in dietary vitamin K was significantly related to lower losses of bone mineral density and smaller increases in the porosity and elasticity attributed to aging, which helps to explain the previously described protective effect of vitamin K intake against osteoporotic fractures.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21447413
[PubMed – in process]

Daily Vibration May Help Aging Bones Stay Healthy

A daily dose of whole body vibration may help reduce the usual bone density loss that occurs with age, Medical College of Georgia researchers report.

Twelve weeks of daily, 30-minute sessions in 18-month old male mice – which equate to 55- to 65-year-old humans – appear to forestall the expected annual loss that can result in fractures, disability and death. Dr. Karl H. Wenger, biomedical engineer in the MCG Schools of Graduate Studies and Medicine, reported the findings with his colleagues in the journal Bone.

Researchers found vibration improved density around the hip joint with a shift toward higher density in the femur, the long bone of the leg, as well. Hip fractures are a major cause of disability and death among the elderly.

They also found a reduction in a biomarker that indicates bone breakdown and an increase in the surface area involved in bone formation in the vibrating group.

The findings provide more scientific evidence that the technique, which dates back to the 1800s and is now showing up in homes, gyms and rehabilitation clinics, has bone benefit, particularly as a low-risk option for injured individuals with limited mobility, Wenger said.

The scientists theorize that the rhythmic movement, which produces a sensation similar to that of a vibrating cell phone but on a larger scale, exercises cells so they work better. Vibration prompts movement of the cell nucleus, which is suspended by numerous threadlike fibers called filaments. “The filaments get all deformed like springs and then they spring back,” Wenger said.

All the movement releases transcription factors that spur new osteoblasts, the cells that make bone. With age, the balance of bone production and destruction – by osteoclasts – tips to the loss side.

In the case of an injury, vibration acts on stem cells, the master controllers of the healing process. “We think that in fracture healing, you get a more dramatic response. We don’t know exactly why it affects the biology differently but it’s likely because of the extent to which stem cells invade the injured area,” Wenger said. They have found that vibration slows stem cell proliferation, which may sound counterintuitive, but likely means more stem cells differentiate into bone cells rather than continuing to just make more generic stem cells. With age, stem cells have difficulty differentiating.

To see if their findings translate to the trauma clinic, they are evaluating vibration tolerance in patients with lower-limb fractures and finding, surprisingly, that even two weeks after injury the subtle vibration is soothing, rather than painful, to most.

The bone group, based in the MCG Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, also is working with Georgia Prevention Institute scientists to explore vibration’s potential to improve glucose uptake – to see if vibration results in more insulin production or aids glucose clearance in some other way – and whether, like exercise, it can reduce fatty liver disease in chunky, pre-diabetic children.

In related studies, postmenopausal women at the peak age of bone decline, experienced results similar to those of Wenger’s aging mice. Wenger’s studies used only male mice to mitigate the impact of fluctuating hormones and focus on aging. In the human study, led by Dr. Clinton T. Rubin at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, the women receiving daily whole body vibration didn’t gain appreciable bone but they did not lose it either.

While vibration lacks the same cardiovascular benefit of exercise, animal and human studies also have shown it can improve muscle strength and weight loss.

Attached files

  • Dr. Karl H. Wenger, biomedical engineer in the MCG Schools of Graduate Studies and Medicine

  • Full bibliographic informationEffect of whole-body vibration on bone properties in aging mice. Bone. 2010 Oct;47(4):746-55. Epub 2010 Jul 16.
    Wenger KH, Freeman JD, Fulzele S, Immel DM, Powell BD, Molitor P, Chao YJ, Gao HS, Elsalanty M, Hamrick MW, Isales CM, Yu JC.
  • Notes for editorsMEDIA CONTACT:Toni Baker
    Public Relations Manager
    Medical College of Georgia
    706-721-4421 Office
    706-732-0401 Beeper
    706-825-6473 Cell
    tbaker@mcg.edu
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