Carb-Restricted Diet Battles Fatty Liver Disease

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The researchers found that the metabolism of dangerous hepatic lipids was “strongly linked” to rapid increases in B vitamins and the bacteria that produce folic acid.

New details about how a carbohydrate-restricted diet improves metabolism were revealed in a study published today. This could lead to improved treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

15/02/2018 KTH The Royal Institute of Technology

A research team in Sweden examined  the effects of reduced carbohydrate consumption – without an accompanying reduction in calorie intake – by putting 10 subjects with obesity and high liver fat on a two-week diet. The study, which involved KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s SciLifeLab research center, combined clinical and big data analysis to determine the subsequent changes in metabolism and gut bacteria.

By doing so, they identified why the subjects showed “rapid and dramatic” reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, along with marked decreases in synthesis of hepatic fat. Published today in Cell Metabolism, the work was authored by researchers from KTH, University of Gothenburg and other international collaborators.

Adil Mardinoglu, a systems biology researcher at KTH, says that the subjects were restricted to an isocaloric, low-carbohydrate diet with increased protein content. The researchers found that the metabolism of dangerous hepatic lipids was “strongly linked” to rapid increases in B vitamins and the bacteria that produce folic acid.

This benefit was coupled by a reduction in the expression of genes that are involved in fatty acid synthesis, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism and fatty acid oxidation.

“A carbohydrate-restricted dietary intervention such as the one we used can be an efficient treatment strategy for a severe health problem, as medical science continues the development of new drugs,” Mardinoglu says.

The study relied upon a combination of systems medicine and advanced clinical studies, with close interaction between experts in systems medicine, basic scientists, nutritionists and clinicians. Combining forces enabled the team to apply a “multi-omics” approach, which means integrating multiple data sets from the body’s omes (genome, proteome, transcriptome, etc.) to identify biomarkers.

“We’ve moved from an era where scientists could work individually and command – in one laboratory – everything they needed, to a world that’s much more interactive,” Mardinoglu says.

Lead author Jan Boren, a professor at University of Gothenburg, says: “We found that the diet, independently of weight-loss, induced rapid and dramatic reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, and revealed hitherto unknown underlying molecular mechanisms.

“It’s important, however, to clarify that diets are complicated and that one type of diet does not fit everyone. For example, subjects with hypercholesterolemia should be careful.”
Liver fat is the earliest abnormality in the pathogenesis of both NAFLD and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) due to metabolic risk factors associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in the presence or absence of alcohol consumption.

Therefore, the strategies the research team identified could be used also for the treatment of AFLD patients, Boren says.

Full bibliographic information

Mardinoglu et al.,

An Integrated Understanding of the Rapid Metabolic Benefits of a Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet on Hepatic Steatosis in Humans,

Cell Metabolism (2018)

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2018.01.005

Stem Cells Boost Immunity Against Candida albicans Infections

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the discovery of this new host/pathogen interaction mechanism and its consequences in the modulation of immune response may provide a new target for intervention in the fight against serious infections.

María Luisa Gil

Professor of microbiology , The University of Valencia

Coconut Oil To Kill Candida Fungus

Using stem cells to boost immunity against Candida albicans infections

26/10/2016 Asociación RUVID

Researchers from the Universitat de València (UV) and the Cedar Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have partnered to describe a biological mechanism that generates cells which are better equipped to fight off serious infections caused by the Candida albicansfungus.

The fungus, which is often found in innocuous form in the oral cavity, vagina and gastrointestinal tract, can cause superficial skin and mucus infections in healthy people. It can also cause serious internal or invasive infections in immunodepressed patients and is as such considered an opportunistic pathogenic fungus.

The research, published in Microbes and Infection, analyses the interaction betweenhematopoietic progenitor and stem cells with this fungus. María Luisa Gil, professor or microbiology at the University of Valencia, explains:

“When stem cells interact directly with the Candida albicans microorganism, this leads quickly to the conversion of these cells into mature mieloid cells -neutrophil, monocyte, macrophages and dendritic cells-, which are what fuel our natural immune system, our first defense against infections”.

The fact of stems cells interacting with the C. albicans microorganism is important because until now it was thought that only mature cells recognised and responded directly to microorganisms and derivatives. The study shows that this interaction can lead to the generation of cells that are functionally better prepared to face off an infection.

Indeed, the discovery of this new host/pathogen interaction mechanism and its consquences in the modulation of immune response may provide a new target for intevention in the fight against serious infections.

Research group and funding

The Immunology of Fungal Infections research group of the Infections) reports to both the department of Microbiology and Ecology, and the Interdisciplinary Research Structure for Biotechnology and Biomedicine (ERI-BIOTECMED) of the University of Valencia. Part of the experimental work was carried out at the University’s Central Service for Experimental Research (SCSIE), and in collaboration with researchers from Cedar Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

The group has been researching immune response to the Candida albicans fungus for a number years. The incidence and seriousness of C. albicans infections has increased considerably over recent decades, due mainly to the increase in at-risk population. The work has received funding from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (ref. SAF2014-53823-P, co-funded by the ERDF).

Full bibliographic information

Javier Megías et al. TLR2, TLR4 and Dectin-1 signalling in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells determines the antifungal phenotype of the macrophages they produce. Microbes and Infection. Volume 18, Issue 5, May 2016, Pages 354–363. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micinf.2016.01.005

Carb-Restricted Diet Battles Fatty Liver Disease

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

The metabolism of dangerous hepatic lipids was “strongly linked” to rapid increases in B vitamins and the bacteria that produce folic acid.

 “We found that the diet, independently of weight-loss, induced rapid and dramatic reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, and revealed hitherto unknown underlying molecular mechanisms.”

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

Study Shows How A Carb-restricted Diet Battles Fatty Liver Disease

KTH The Royal Institute of Technology

New details about how a carbohydrate-restricted diet improves metabolism were revealed in a study published today, which could lead to improved treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

A research team in Sweden examined  the effects of reduced carbohydrate consumption – without an accompanying reduction in calorie intake – by putting 10 subjects with obesity and high liver fat on a two-week diet. The study, which involved KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s SciLifeLab research center, combined clinical and big data analysis to determine the subsequent changes in metabolism and gut bacteria.

By doing so, they identified why the subjects showed “rapid and dramatic” reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, along with marked decreases in synthesis of hepatic fat. Published today in Cell Metabolism, the work was authored by researchers from KTH, University of Gothenburg and other international collaborators.

Adil Mardinoglu, a systems biology researcher at KTH, says that the subjects were restricted to an isocaloric, low-carbohydrate diet with increased protein content. The researchers found that the metabolism of dangerous hepatic lipids was “strongly linked” to rapid increases in B vitamins and the bacteria that produce folic acid.

This benefit was coupled by a reduction in the expression of genes that are involved in fatty acid synthesis, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism and fatty acid oxidation.

“A carbohydrate-restricted dietary intervention such as the one we used can be an efficient treatment strategy for a severe health problem, as medical science continues the development of new drugs,” Mardinoglu says.

The study relied upon a combination of systems medicine and advanced clinical studies, with close interaction between experts in systems medicine, basic scientists, nutritionists and clinicians. Combining forces enabled the team to apply a “multi-omics” approach, which means integrating multiple data sets from the body’s omes (genome, proteome, transcriptome, etc.) to identify biomarkers.

“We’ve moved from an era where scientists could work individually and command – in one laboratory – everything they needed, to a world that’s much more interactive,” Mardinoglu says.

Lead author Jan Boren, a professor at University of Gothenburg, says: “We found that the diet, independently of weight-loss, induced rapid and dramatic reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors, and revealed hitherto unknown underlying molecular mechanisms.

“It’s important, however, to clarify that diets are complicated and that one type of diet does not fit everyone. For example, subjects with hypercholesterolemia should be careful.”

Liver fat is the earliest abnormality in the pathogenesis of both NAFLD and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) due to metabolic risk factors associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in the presence or absence of alcohol consumption.

Therefore, the strategies the research team identified could be used also for the treatment of AFLD patients, Boren says.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2018.01.005

 

Burn Calories Fast With These 6 Foods

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure
Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

Want to burn your calories fast? Just add these 6 foods to diet to speed up metabolism

International Business Times

Take a look at some of these nutrient-rich foods to increase your metabolism.

There are a number of drinks and other products in the market that claim to boost your metabolism. But the effectiveness of these products is, however, questionable. What goes without saying is that natural foods are the best. If you didn’t know, these vitamins and nutrient rich foods can actually boost your metabolism and give your body the sustenance it needs to survive and thrive.

Beans

Beans are loaded with dietary fibre which lowers the insulin levels and improves insulin sensitivity over time. This in turn, helps your body to store less fat. It serves as an excellent food for boosting metabolism.

Oily fish

Oily fishes such as salmon and tuna are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids reduce resistance to leptin – a hormone that helps in determining how fast fat is burned.

It also balances blood sugar and helps in reducing inflammation and both of them helps in regulating metabolism. So, oily fish is a great choice for boosting your metabolism.

Cruciferous vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts contain essential nutrients like calcium and vitamin C that will speed up your metabolism. Apart from it, they also have high water and fibre content. This combination increases the ability of the body to burn fat.

Hot peppers

You may have heard that spicy foods help in boosting your metabolism and it is true. The compound, capsaicin that makes peppers hot helps your body burn more energy. It even curbs your hunger for at least three hours after you eat. It serves as an excellent food for increasing metabolism.

Berries

Berries stabilize the glucose levels and decrease the body fat content showing beneficial effects on metabolism. Eating red berries also hasa positive impact on cardiovascular health.

Citrus fruits

Citrus fruits are great for digestion. They are low in sugar and contain an antioxidant that helps in lower your blood sugar response after meals. The vitamin C in citrus fruits helps in faster metabolism.

→  Read full article

 

5 Foods To Boost Your Mental Health

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Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

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Boost your mental health by including these 5 foods in your diet

International Business Times

Dementia cases can be prevented by adding right kind of foods to the diet. Read on to know more.

A healthy body is necessary for having a healthy mind. And to achieve that, all you need to do is consume the right kind of food.

According to a study published in medical journal The Lancet in July, one in three cases of dementia can be prevented if people strengthen their mental health by improving their diet.

Therefore, include these foods in your diet to have a sound mind:

Salmon

Salmon is rich in Omega-3 and anti-inflammatory fatty acids such as EPA and DHA, which are healthy fats required for the brain. Andrea D’Ambrosio, a spokesperson for Dieticians of Canada and registered dietician at Dietetic Directions told Global News: “The fatty acids basically help protect our brains and cells and help with anti-inflammation so our brain can send signals to other parts of our body.”

“An imbalance of Omega-3 fats also impacts how our brain cells communicate with one another, and research has found that a lower intake of Omega-3 is associated with a higher risk of depression,” explains D’Ambrosio.

Berries and cherries

Shamsah Sonawalla, consultant psychiatrist, Jaslok Hospital and Research Center, Mumbai told LiveMint that for a good brain health, it’s important to have foods that reduce inflammation. Since berries and cherries are rich in antioxidants, it protects our brain from developing neuropsychiatric disorders like anxiety, depression, as well as Alzheimer’s. “In addition, they contain flavonoids that enhance mood, help in hormonal balance and reduce cortisol, the stress hormone,” she added.

Walnuts

The brain-shaped nuts are good for the brain. They are one of the best sources of omega 3 fatty acids for the vegetarians. The omega 3 fatty acids present in the nuts are essential to reduce stress, improve your mood, and boost concentration.

Sweet potato

Sweet potatoes are rich in the antioxidant beta-carotene. Also, it can be helpful in reducing the oxidative stress on DNA, which has been linked to several neuropsychiatric disorders like depression, anxiety and schizophrenia.

Bananas

Bananas are loaded with B-complex vitamins that help in soothing the nervous system. Apart from that, the fruit has magnesium which is again essential for good brain functioning.

“Bananas are mood-enhancing because it affects tryptophan, which is another essential amino acid that helps produce serotonin…Tryptophan also helps with sleep, regulates our food intake – both which are associated with impacting mood as well,” says D’Ambrosio.

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