How ”Extreme Levels” of Monsanto’s Herbicide Roundup in Food Became the Industry Norm

Vitamins, Minerals and Roundup

TruthOut
By Thomas Bøhn and Marek Cuhra

Food and feed quality are crucial to human and animal health. Quality can be defined as sufficiency of appropriate minerals, vitamins and fats, etc. but it also includes the absence of toxins, whether man-made or from other sources. Surprisingly, almost no data exist in the scientific literature on herbicide residues in herbicide tolerant genetically modified (GM) plants, even after nearly 20 years on the market.

One of the supposed benefits of genetically modified crops was supposed to be a reduction in pesticide use. So how’s that working out?

The global market for agrochemicals was valued at USD 207.5 billion in 2014. It is projected to reach USD 250.5 billion by 2020, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.2% from 2015 to 2020.

Asia-Pacific dominated the global market with a share of around 36.7%. The European region is expected to be the fastest-growing market in the near future, for the growing concentration of farmers towards technology driven agriculture practices.

So what is the recommended daily dose of toxic pesticides?
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Swiss Chard Fritters With Feta, Fennel and Radish

This recipe from the New Orleans-based restaurant pairs crisp, lemony Swiss chard fritters with creamy feta and a radish-fennel salad.

From the Wall Street Journal.

There’s no way to lose with these ingredients, especially when you deep fry the fritters in ghee.  You probably don’t need three inches of oil either. That sounds like something a pro would do.

With a Summer veggie garden largess, swiss chard, radishes and fennel are always more abundant than we can eat. We saw this recipe and decided to take a page from the best of our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) organizations and share recipes for the goodies being distributed to the community. Feel free to play around with the ingredients and experiment with what’s growing in your garden.

ZING BEARERS | Dill, mint and lemon zest mixed into the batter brighten the earthy flavor of the Swiss chard. Christopher Testani for The Wall Street Journal, Food Styling by Heather Meldrom, Prop Styling by Stephanie Hanes

The Chef: Susan Spicer

Her Restaurants: Bayona and Mondo, both in New Orleans

What She’s Known For: Bringing easygoing grace to fine dining in the Crescent City. Delivering global flavors with classical-French finesse.

SUSAN SPICER RUNS a democratic kitchen. “It’s the stone soup approach,” she said. “Everyone has something to add. I want cooks to feel invested.” She credits Amarys Herndon, her sous-chef at Bayona, for this dish of chard fritters with whipped feta and a fennel-radish salad. “Amarys made this for a special one night, and I was like, ‘That is the best thing I have ever tasted with chard,’ ” she said. “Though I like greens, chard is probably my least favorite; it can taste too earthy. But these fritters were lighter than I expected. They really elevated the chard experience.” The batter, made of shredded chard, beaten egg and chickpea flour, quickly fries up into airy puffs, crisp on the outside and creamy within. Finding the right way to complete the plate was largely intuitive. “The fritters felt Greek to me,” Ms. Spicer explained. “That’s why we used feta and lemon in the sauce.” The shaved radish and fennel provide needed contrast: “If we do something fried, we like to put a nice, fresh element in there too

 

 

Ingredients

Swiss Chard Fritters With Feta, Fennel and Radish

Total Time: 35 minutes Serves: 4

2 bunches Swiss chard, stems removed and leaves roughly chopped

1 cup chickpea flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

3 eggs

½ cup soda water

1 tablespoon lemon zest, plus juice of half a lemon

1 teaspoon finely grated garlic

2 tablespoons finely chopped dill, plus sprigs for garnish

2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper

½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Olive oil, for frying and drizzling

1 cup feta cheese, at room temperature

½ cup cream cheese, at room temperature

6 radishes, thinly sliced

2 small fennel bulbs, thinly sliced

 

Directions

1. In a food processor, pulse chard until finely shredded. Remove ⅔ of chard and set aside in a large bowl.

2. Add chickpea flour, baking powder, baking soda, eggs and soda water to chard remaining in food processor. Process until evenly mixed, about 1 minute.

3. Scrape chard purée into large bowl with shredded chard. Add lemon zest, garlic, dill, mint, cinnamon, Aleppo pepper and nutmeg to bowl and fold everything together. Season with salt and pepper. Set batter aside.

4. In a medium pot over medium-high heat, bring 3 inches oil to 350 degrees. Use a deep-fat or candy thermometer to monitor temperature and keep it steady throughout cooking.

5. Meanwhile, clean bowl of food processor. Add feta and cream cheese and process until fluffy. Season with lemon juice and salt. Set aside. In a medium bowl, toss radishes and fennel slices with a squeeze of lemon juice, a light drizzle of olive oil and salt to taste. Set aside.

6. Use a ladle to add 3 tablespoons batter to oil. Working in batches, fry 4 fritters at a time until crisp and puffy, about 2 minutes per side. Use a slotted spoon to transfer fritters to a paper-towel-lined plate and season with salt.

7. To serve: Smear feta spread onto each plate. Place 2-3 fritters and some fennel-radish salad alongside. Garnish with dill sprigs.

 

Heart Failure Associated With Loss Of Important Gut Bacteria

Heart Failure Associated With Loss Of Important Gut Bacteria

11 July 2017 Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung (DZHK)

In the gut of patients with heart failure, important groups of bacteria are found less frequently and the gut flora is not as diverse as in healthy individuals. It has long been known that heart failure and gut health are linked. The gut has a worse blood supply in instances of heart failure; the intestinal wall is thicker and more permeable, whereby bacteria and bacterial components may find their way into the blood. Moreover, scientists know that the composition of the gut bacteria is altered in other widespread diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

Diet, medication and smoking have the largest influence on the make up of gut flora. The differences between healthy individuals and those with heart failure came about mainly through the loss of bacteria of the genera Blautia and Collinsella, as well as two previously unknown genera that belong to the families Erysipelotrichaceae and Ruminococcaceae.

Is it the chicken or the egg when it comes to cause and effect? Or, should we be using the “garbage in” and “garbage out” model? When it comes to our food consumption habits and health impacts, I’d start there.
→  Read full article

Full bibliographic information Original publication: Heart failure is associated with depletion of core intestinal microbiota. Luedde, M., Winkler, T., Heinsen, F.-M., Rühlemann, M. C., Spehlmann, M. E., Bajrovic, A., Lieb, W., Franke, A., Ott, S. J. & Frey, N. ESC Heart Failure, (2017)
DOI: 10.1002/ehf2.12155

Black Raspberry Improves Cardiovascular Risk In Metabolic Syndrome

Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries

Black Raspberry Improves Cardiovascular Risk in Metabolic Syndrome

28/04/2016 19:51 GMT Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers

A new study shows that black raspberry extract can significantly lower a key measure of arterial stiffness-an indicator of cardiovascular disease. Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries, according to the study published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers (http://www.liebertpub..com/). The article is available free on the Journal of Medicinal Food (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jmf.2015.3563) website until May 28, 2016.
→  Read full article

Full bibliographic information Black Raspberry Extract Increased Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improved Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Jeong Han Saem, Kim Sohyeon, Hong Soon Jun, Choi Seung Cheol, Choi Ji-Hyun, Kim Jong-Ho, Park Chi-Yeon, Cho Jae Young, Lee Tae-Bum, Kwon Ji-Wung, Joo Hyung Joon, Park Jae Hyoung, Yu Cheol Woong, and Lim Do-Sun. Journal of Medicinal Food. April 2016, 19(4): 346-352. doi:10.1089/jmf.2015.3563.
Published in Volume: 19 Issue 4: April 13, 2016
Online Ahead of Print: February 18, 2016

Your Fat Is Not Your Fault

Your Fat Is Not Your Fault!

In seven new approaches by seven experts reviewed, this is one common theme shared by the authors . All of them have been (or still are) in the trenches of individual coaching, and all have successfully guided hundreds and even thousands of clients to sustainable weight loss. And, all of them are promoting a healthy weight lifestyle.

Other common themes include poor or inappropriate diet, inflammation, malfunctioning digestion, and allergenic foods. Along with environmental toxins, these are named as the underlying causes of bloat and toxic fat deposits. However, the experts don’t always agree with each other.

Mindset, a customized approach, eating whole foods and “fit fats”, eliminating common food allergens, detoxification plans, and healing the gut trend throughout. Although to a person, the authors disdain the old eat-less-exercise-more approach, you’ll notice that you’ll be eating differently, often asked to fast, and be directed to follow an exercise routine.

All the programs are designed to keep you from feeling hungry, even those which utilize intermittent fasting. However, fasting is a learned mental discipline and can cause some discomfort on fasting days.

FYI: If you are over 40 and have trouble losing weight, you may need to supplement CoenzymeQ10. In one study, CoQ-deficient people took 100 mg per day. At the end of nine weeks, they had lost 30 lbs compared with only 13 lbs in the nondeficient group.

→  Read full article

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