Are Managed Bees Making Wild Bees Sick?

Wild pollinators have been under assault around the world. Crop production has turned to shipping bee hives to farms to offset the impacts of declining wild populations. So how’s that working out?

Peter Graystock a post doc researcher at UC Riverside’s Department of Entomology says this practice is spreading to wild bee populations, putting them under additional stress.

A new paper outlining the problem and offering solutions is online at the International Journal of Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife

Read the paper online here.

Baby Knows Best

Tart Cherry Juice Lowers Blood Pressure

Baby knows best! Study shows baby-led weaning promotes healthy food preferences.

A study by psychologists at The University of Nottingham has shown that babies who are weaned using solid finger food are more likely to develop healthier food preferences and are less likely to become overweight as children than those who are spoon-fed pureed food.

The psychologists believe that understanding the factors that contribute to healthy nutrition in early childhood is crucial as this could be the best time to modify food preferences to encourage healthy diets. The findings show that baby-led weaning has a positive impact on the liking of carbohydrates – foods that form the building blocks of healthy nutrition. This is a significant result since, up to now, the factors thought to be most influential on early food preferences are sweetness and frequency of exposure.

http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=116290&CultureCode=en

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Coffee Consumption Lowers Tinnitus Incidence In Women

A Prospective Study of Caffeine Intake and Risk of Incident Tinnitus

Background

Caffeine is a commonly consumed substance that has been thought to play a role in the development of tinnitus, but prospective data are lacking. We prospectively evaluated the association between caffeine intake and self-reported tinnitus in a female cohort.

Methods

Participants were 65,085 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II, aged 30 to 44 years and without tinnitus at baseline in 1991, who completed questionnaires about lifestyle and medical history every 2 years and food frequency questionnaires every 4 years. Information on self-reported tinnitus and date of onset was obtained from the 2009 questionnaire, with cases defined as those reporting experiencing symptoms “a few days/week” or “daily.” Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models.

Results

At baseline, the mean age of the cohort was 36.3 years and the mean caffeine intake was 242.3 mg/d. After 18 years of follow-up, 5289 incident cases of tinnitus were reported. There was a significant inverse association between caffeine intake and the incidence of tinnitus. Compared with women with caffeine intake less than 150 mg/d (150 mg corresponds to ∼ one 8-ounce cup of coffee), the multivariable adjusted hazard ratios were 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.95) for those who consumed 450 to 599 mg/d and 0.79 (0.68-0.91) for those who consumed 600 mg/d or more.

Conclusions

In this prospective study, higher caffeine intake was associated with a lower risk of incident tinnitus in women.

References

 

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