Quail Eggs An Allergy Relief Nutraceutical

Quail Eggs A Nutraceutical for Allergy Relief
Quail Eggs A Nutraceutical for Allergy Relief

A promising new allergy treatment from Europe is derived from of all things, quail egg powder.

The story of quail eggs begins with a French doctor who noticed that farmers who raised quail had fewer allergy symptoms than other patients from the surrounding area. That launched a series of experiments and clinical trials leading to a product that has shown significant reduction of allergic rhinitis.

Gene Bruno has a detailed, well researched story about quail egg powder at Vitamin Retailer magazine. See references tab.

References:

1 Pawankar R, Canonica GW, Holgate ST, Lockey RF. WAO White Book on Allergy. Milwaukee, WI: World Allergy Organization; 2011.

2 Schiller JS, Lucas JW, Ward BW, Peregoy JA. Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2010. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat. 2012;10(252):208 pgs.

3 American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Asthma Facts. Retrieved January 22, 2016 from www.aaaai.org/about-the-aaaai/newsroom/asthma-statistics.aspx.

4 Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved January 22, 2016 from www.childstats.gov/pdf/ac2012/ ac_12.pdf.

5 American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Allergy Facts. Retrieved January 22, 2016 from http://acaai.org/news/facts-statistics/allergies. 6 Allergy Treatment: Allergy Medication. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2014. Retrieved January 22, 2016 from http://acaai.org/allergies/treatment/medication.

7 Truffier JC. Approche therapeutique de la maladie allergique par ingestion d’oeufs de caille. La Clinique. 1978;22: 2-4.

8 Bruttman G. Study 1 (réf. 82-83-1): Dust Mite-Induced Allergic Asthma In Children. & Bruttman G. “Ovix” Quail Egg Homogenate: A Clinical Evaluation. La Medicina Biologica. April-June 1995;2:25-29.

9 Bruttman G. Study 2 (réf. 83-2): Exclusive Pollen-Induced Rhinitis. & Bruttman G. “Ovix” Quail Egg Homogenate: A Clinical Evaluation. La Medicina Biologica. April-June 1995;2:25-29.

10 Bruttman G. Study 3 (réf. 83-3): Pollen-Induced Rhinitis. & Bruttman G. “Ovix” Quail Egg Homogenate: A Clinical Evaluation. La Medicina Biologica. April-June 1995;2:25-29.

11 Bruttman G. Study 4 (réf. 88-1): Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis. & Bruttman G. “Ovix” Quail Egg Homogenate: A Clinical Evaluation. La Medicina Biologica. April-June 1995;2:25-29.

12 Benichou AC, Armanet M, Bussiere A, Chevreau N, Cardot J-M, Tetard J. A Proprietary Blend of Quail Egg for the Attenuation of Nasal Provocation with a Standardized Allergenic Challenge: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Food Sci Nutr. 2014 Nov;2(6):655-63.

13 Bousquet J, Khaltaev N, Cruz AA, Denburg J, Fokkens WJ, Togias A, et al. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) 2008 update (in collaboration with the World Health Organization, GA(2)LEN and AllerGen). Allergy. 2008;63 Suppl 86:8-160.

14 Reed CE, Kita H. The role of protease activation of inflammation in allergic respiratory diseases. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Nov;114(5):997-1008.

15 Pawankar R, Canonica GW, Holgate ST, Lockey RF. WAO White Book on Allergy. Milwaukee, WI: World Allergy Organization; 2011.

16 Widmer F, Hayes PJ, Whittaker RG, Kumar RK. Substrate preference profiles of proteases released by allergenic pollens. Clin Exp Allergy. 2000 Apr;30(4):571-6.

17 Feeney RE, Means GE, Bigler JC. Inhibition of human trypsin, plasmin, and thrombin by naturally occurring inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes. J Biol Chem. 1969;244(8):1957-1960.

18 Takahashi K, Kitao S, Tashiro M, Asao T, Kanamori M. Inhibitory specificity against various trypsins and stability of ovomucoid from Japanese quail egg white. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). dec 1994;40(6):593-601.

How Do You Solve the Sugar Epidemic? Solve Flavor Defects

Decorated Cookie Monsters

For many consumers, the ability to actually taste has been diminished by the addition of flavor blockers. Food formulators have been tasked with masking those pesky sour, astringent or bitter tastes to develop palatable products. Sugar does the heavy lifting for many formulations. It’s plentiful, cheap and keeps us fat and happy.

The food industry is undergoing a major disruption as consumers are waking up to the perils of sugar..has written an excellent article discussing some of the healthier sugar substitutes available to formulators. Stevia, monk fruit and mushrooms are in the pantry. For more surprises, read more.

With the average American consuming three times the daily recommend amount of sugar and obesity reaching epidemic proportions, the food industry is frantically trying to develop healthier products. However, taking sugar out of foods is not as simple as it sounds as it provides a critical role in product development due to flavor defects.

 

Mediterranean 5-grain Salad with Sunchokes, Beets & Mozzarella

Our friends at Green Kitchen Storie  created this salad in collaboration with Swedish/Italian family company Zeta. They are launching a new range of organic whole grain mixes . Since grains can be a little colourless, they asked Green Kitchen Stories for a delicious recipe that looked stunning (no pressure, right). Luise and Elsa share a deep love for Italy and Italian flavours and they truly indulged in that while creating this salad.

The grains add a nourishing base for this salad and they are tossed in pesto for extra flavor. They add sunchokes that are roasted until buttery soft  and mix with thinly sliced raw, crunchy chioggia beets (aka candy cane or polka beets) and radishes. Of course they threw in some mozzarella and pine nuts (influenced by Italy!), and added red grapes for sweetness. All in all, it’s a real beauty of a salad, it is very nourishing and tastes just as good as it looks.

The idea of mixing chioggia beets with radishes for a colourful kick is shamelessly inspired by some of the salads in Erin Irelands instagram feed (worth checking out btw!).

Mediterranean 5-grain Salad with Sunchokes, Beets & Mozzarella
Serves 4–6

1 bag (250 g / 1 1/2 cup) Zeta organic 5-grain mix (Farro, Barley, Kamut, Brown Rice and Oat Groats), or grains of choice
500 g / 1 lb sunchoke/jerusalem artichoke
2 chunks mozzarella di bufalo
4 polka beets (chioggia) or yellow beets, peeled
1 bunch radishes, rinsed
200 g / 7 oz red grapes, halved
1 handful pine nuts, lightly toasted
2 handfuls rucola/arugula
1 bunch fresh basil

Pesto dressing
5 tbsp green pesto
2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil
juice from 1/2 lemon

Preheat the oven to 200°C / 400°F. Rinse and brush the sunchokes (don’t bother peeling them) and cut them in 5-10 mm (1/4-inch) slices. Place the slices in a bowl, drizzle over olive oil and toss them until everything is covered in oil. Spread out the slices on a baking sheet covered with baking paper. Roast for 30-40 minutes or until soft with crispy edges.

Meanwhile, cook the grains in a large sauce pan filled with salted water, following the cooking time on the package. Drain any excess water and scoop the grains back into the sauce pan.

Stir together the pesto dressing and pour over the grains in the sauce pan. Make sure they are all covered and then pour the grains out onto a wide plate or salad bowl.

Layer with sunchoke slices and torn mozzarella chunks. Use a mandolin (or sharp knife) to shave the polka beets and radishes very thinly and spread on top of the salad together with pine nuts, grapes, rucola/arugula and basil.

Tasty Tomato Tart Always a Crowd Pleaser

Tasty Tomato Tart

Ingredients

1 package Phyllo Dough (thaw to package instructions)

1 egg

1/2 stick of Butter(1 tablespoon for caramelizing onions and melt the rest for the layering of the Phyllo)

1/2 cup yellow and red grape tomatoes

1/2 up heirloom tomatoes

1/2 cup zucchini and yellow squash

1 cup Ricotta cheese

1/2 cup Feta cheese

1 brown onion sliced thin

1 teaspoon lemon zest

2 tablespoons Red Balsamic Vinegar

1/4 cup Fresh Basil chopped fine

Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions

1.Slice Tomatoes place in a bowl with salt , pepper ,a drizzle of EVOO and Balsamic Vinegar .Cover and refrigerate at least an hour. Slice onions ,place in skillet with butter and EVOO,add salt and pepper, saute until golden brown.Remove from skillet and let cool. Slice zucchini and squash in circles, add to skillet , saute about 5 to 10 mins. in EVOO, add salt and pepper. Remove from heat and let cool.Remember it is important to flavor every layer. Salting the tomatoes and letting them drain before adding them to the tart ensures that your tart ends up intense and jammy instead of watery.
2.Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Brush the bottom and side of a 9-inch tart pan with some of the melted butter. For crust, unroll phyllo dough; cover with plastic wrap. Remove one sheet of phyllo and lightly brush with melted butter. Place a second sheet of phyllo on top, placing it at an angle to the first sheet; brush with butter. Repeat with remaining phyllo sheets one at a time, placing each at an angle to the previous sheet to form a circle and brushing each with butter. Using a wide spatula, transfer the phyllo stack to the prepared pan, carefully easing it into the pan and allowing some of the phyllo to hang about 1/2 inch over the edge of the pan. Make two slits in the center of the phyllo stack for steam to escape.

3. Bake in preheated oven about 8 minutes or until phyllo is light golden brown. Cool on a wire rack. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees F.
4.Meanwhile, drain the tomatoes, reserving 2 tablespoons of the marinade. Set tomatoes aside. In a large mixing bowl, mix the Ricotta cheese with fork until smooth. Add feta cheese,  herbs, lemon zest ,mix well. Add eggs,mix just until combined (do not over mix). Pour mixture into crust-lined pan.
5. Add the carmelized onions to the top of the ricotta and drizzle a tablespoon of the tomato marinade on the onions .  Begin placing the tomatoes around the outer edge of the tart pan,continue to fill in. Place the zucchini and squash in a similar pattern( see photo) until the tart is completely filled in.Drizzle with the remaining marinade.
6. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes or until center is soft-set and edge stays firm when gently shaken. If necessary, loosely cover the edge with foil the last 10 minutes of baking to prevent overbrowning. Cool in pan on a wire rack.

Remove  from pan,if desired, let tart stand at room temperature for 30 minutes to bring out its fullest flavor. If desired, garnish with fresh herbs. Cut tart into wedges. Makes 10 servings.

This wonderful simple tart is always a crowd pleaser. I constantly get asked “what’s in it ?”  or “Tell us how to make it!”.

Heirloom tomatoes are some of the most impressively colorful fruits out there. They range from dark purple to sunshine yellow, and can be as small as a Roma tomato or as big as a navel orange. You’ll find the best ones at the best prices in July and August when they’re in season, but no matter when you get them, use them quickly. Their shelf life is shorter than that of their classic red brethren.

If you can’t find heirloom tomatoes in your area, you can make this recipe with Roma or plum tomatoes instead. Here it is… I LOVE to cook for others and am an avid fan of the local foodie movement .

A little back history on my love of food..I was fortunate to have grown up in a time where the kitchen and gathering together for meals was an important daily activity. We prepared a well rounded variety of styles of cooking from around the globe. We grew some veggies, herbs, scratched baked everything,made our own sauces and jams,etc. My grandmother had me washing rice and helping prepare meals ever since I can remember. Fresh as can be (luckily Grandma worked for a major Produce vendor) was Grandma’s way. Watching Julia Child, the Galloping Gourmet and Jacque Pepin were my visual  food influencers as well.

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